The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 1 year ago

EP 41: Bringing Your Team Value Everyday feat Michael Coscetta

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this edition of "Is it a good time?", Brandon talks shop with Mike Coscetta, Chief Sales and Strategy Officer at Compass. 

Hello, everyone, and welcome to the revenue collective podcast. I am your host, Brandon Martin, And you are listening. Teoh, is this a good time? The show where I asked revenue collective members from really basic questions and they have incredible answers. We're coming to you every Tuesday and Thursday. So please subscribe if you wanna make sure to catch all the great interviews with folks who likely will be your boss one day. So today, our guest is Michel Caserta, chief sales and strategy officer. A compass. And we discuss bringing your team value every single day before we get going with the questions I wanted to tell you a little bit about this one. Sponsors six cents six cents. The number one account engagement platform helps you identify accounts that air in market for your solution. Prioritize your efforts. Engage buyers the right way with the highly relevant messaging and measure what actually matters. With six cents platform, you're able to get into more deals, improved win rates, increase overall pipeline and optimize budget. Spend to learn more about six cents. Visit six cents dot com slash revenue. Collective. All right, let's do this. Episode four of is this a good time. All right, Here we are with my casita. Thank you so much for joining us. Mike is the chief sales and strategy officer. Compass has worked throughout the industry Titan of industry to me and certainly somebody who I've enjoyed getting to know. I appreciate you being here. Thank you. Great being here as someone who's only 59 I've never been called the Titan of anything. So I appreciate the flattery here on a weekend before we had a weekend. That's I mean, come on. You know your reputation here. Out. Eyes outsized for your height. No worries on that. Eso Look, I always like to give people a little bio. You are now this big role at Compass. You've held a amazing title at square. Just give us a little bit of...

...your baseball. How did you get there? Right, you know. And what is your current role today? Yeah. So today my responsibility is to drive revenue. It's a fun role. It's easy to simple place to start to take a number from the beginning of the year and make sure it's higher on a lot higher on a nice aggressive trajectory by the end of the year, but also looking at all the different new ways we could make money. We have an amazing core agent business, and we're always looking at new revenue streams and new partnerships and new business development opportunities that make the business even more exciting, more sustainable, more diversified and and all the things that you know, we hope the world will eventually judge us by. Prior to this, I let all global sales at Square Amazing Company. I think most people probably today know of square incredible fintech player that obviously built in a Knauss, um, business in the credit card processing and point of sale world and now is doing the same on the consumer and the financial service world with cash up, Bitcoin trading and, you know, stock trading and all the other stuff that's in the news these days. But my whole career has been, you know, attached to sales revenue, marketing, go to market partnerships, channel all this stuff attached to the money, and I've got a big nose on. My CEO says that the nose for money, so I keep chasing it. It sounds like you've touched all of those areas you know, maybe we'll have you come back on. We'll do the big 45 minute long one at some point, but hopefully we'll get into a little bit of it here. I always talk about success and luck being two things. You know, both of those things are what make you you know who you are and get you where you got in your case. Is there a specific example of hard work that you kind of got me through something or is there a specific example of luck? Well, I mean, I think it's always luck, right? You never know who you're gonna meet, how you're going to meet that person, how that person introduces you to another person, whether it be as a way of generating a lead that eventually becomes a big deal. Does that big deal make your name that gets you promoted and all of a sudden, your name and a company that no one knew before? Or is it an intro to how you got a job or how a recruiter found you? Eso positioning? There's a lot of luck in my career. There's a lot of luck. I think, in any...

...sea levels career. But I think if I were to say, the one thing that's always driven me is just this this insatiable curiosity and it's made me a nerd. But it's also made me really understanding Ah, lot of different businesses and a lot of different ways of doing things That hopefully makes me more well rounded and allows me to bounce from industry to industry or job to job with the same ability to ramp, quickly toe, learn an industry quickly and to share, you know, value and to make other people around me better. I like that. And now how did you get their job but square, you know, how were you introduced to the company? There was a headhunter that found me or recruiter actually from square, who found me when I was in New York, back in New York now, obviously. But at the time they were looking to grow their New York office, and they were looking for a GM of the New York office, someone to run sales, marketing partnerships, account management, support, even caviar when they owned caviar at the time. Eso that's where the conversation started, but that never panned out because they ended up not going the GM route. They asked me if I wanted to be a sales manager for the New York sales team. I said no because of the time I was. I was leading all sales and marketing at a startup called Structured Web, which is still around and still doing very well. But a year later, Square came back and said, I think we have a different opportunity and one that was much bigger, much cooler. And that was their head of sales and first ahead of strategic sales, which was like half their sales organization. Then about five and six months later, I got promoted to run all of their global sales organ. Then we scaled that internationally. But that's how that story happened, you know. So it was a no the first time. And thankfully, you know what? They came back a year later with something completely different, more exciting, maybe a lesson for people on, you know, making sure that when you do say no to a role, that you're doing it in a way that they're gonna want to come back to you. If there's something else that fits, you know, respectfully and handed, you know, that's that's that's That's excellent on DSO you know, every day we're in, we're in the weeds on, you know, doing sales and marketing, and and so forth. Give us a tactic that you think people...

...can use. I mean, it could be something for a account executive. It could be something for a sales leader. Is there a tactic on? I mean, you've led so many large teams. Maybe there's a tactic on leadership that you could share with us. I'm gonna give you two. So number one is on the leadership topic is you should be adding value to every single person you interact with every day. And how do you add value? Well, it could be teaching them something. It could be helping them focus. It could be helping them solve a problem. It could be giving them confidence, giving them inspiration. But every single interaction should leave someone going from here to here. And you should be a key driver off that, and I think you could define that in 100 different ways. But that's how I think about leading an organization every day. The second thing I would say is on a tactic for, like business development or revenue growth is that you should always have things bucket it into, like, what's highly predictive meaning? Like what? What is our trajectory? And I know we're going to get from here to here. So, like, how do I make sure that doesn't fall? The second is what's very probable, right? What can I see is like, Well, it might just take a little tinkering, but I can have a very high confidence. We could change this trajectory or add a new level to it this way, and then what's possible and kind of always having this little experimentation bucket for things for little seeds that you can plant that. Hey, maybe they grow quicker than you think, where there's traction where you didn't even predicted. And then, boom, you've got your next hammer, you know, to go nail. And that's that's the fun part I think of. Look, looking at all these businesses and looking at these different parts of the business that there should always be the next thing. But you have to make sure that you continue to feed the existing thing and keep that flywheel spinning. Yeah, what would you say? Like, do you think that's 10% of your, you know, kind of resource is or, you know, mindshare into the new thing? Or is it 5% or is it 20 right? Like, yeah, it depends on the company stage. You know, if you're in early stage business, if you're a syriza or serious, be revenue leader, it's probably 75% because you have no idea what the hell is working or or Or maybe you know, I know this works. But, hey, I'm going to try this and I'm...

...gonna try this and I'm gonna try all these other things and you have to do that without bankrupting your company and running out of cash, right? If you're a much later stage company or a public company, you probably have a very specific and small amount of budget dedicated to what is not predictive, not probable, but is only in that possible bucket because you can't just be burning money. You know, you've got to be delivering quarterly numbers with high level of precision, but you gotta have some, and if you don't have something, will be left behind by the company that does innovate. That's how Intel became intel on a M D and in video. And others have quantum leap them because again, they stopped looking for that next big thing. And for you, I mean, obviously, you're in a very large company. Uh, there was news of an s one filing, so you know, you're gonna be a large public company at that, you know, do you spend? Is it a small amount of time and innovation Because you you need that predictable revenue Or is it is it a large, you know, a large amount of time because you still have so much room to grow. I mean, yeah, I can't say anything about what we're doing related to the S one or a public filing, but I can say that given our size and just given, What I always want to see is that I always want my revenue engine to be, you know, very profitable. Highly, you know, very repeatable, predictable and scalable on. If it can't be those four things, and to me, it's it's kind of gonna fall apart. It's eventually going to collapse. So, you know, I always wanna be tinkering. I always want to know what I can guarantee my CFO quarter over quarter a year over year. But I also always wanna have a couple of cards up my sleeve to say, you know, if this hits, you know, I drew an ace. Hell, if the next thing that comes in is a king learn pretty damn good shape here. You know, if I have an ace in the next thing that comes in is a deuce. Okay, Well, next, you know, put it aside so you don't make big bets, but you've gotta have the little bits kind of running hot and simultaneously if they're suited. You still play them, though, because you got the wheel coming in anyway. Yeah, Ace. Anything suited? Yeah, that's your double triple. You know, you know the multipliers in poker. I do get it on dso. You know,...

...let's get into just a little bit of the lightning round. What? You know anything that you're hiring for right now, So yeah, funny enough. It's a role that might not excite many people, but I need an accounts receivable lead for one of my products, which is like a collections role. And we're also interviewing for well Let's just say in the future I can predict we're going to be interviewing for some more sales types. Roles in one of my products are Home Services product. But, you know, Compass has a ton of openings nationwide. We probably have over 500 openings, so I would encourage people just to go check out the career site. There's a lot on there. Yeah, and how many people on your team in general, that's a very hard question. Answer. Because I've got a direct team and I've got a very large amount of indirect teams who support one or more of our programs. I don't run a typical sales function, so my titles relatively abstruse to anyone on the outside. But there are a lot of different functions positioned around the company that air driving revenue, whether it be through our Compass concierge program, our Bridge loans program are leads program. Our Vendor Home Services program, our new development division. There's a lot under me that's out. There s Oh, I wish I could give you an exact answer, but it would be it would be made up. It sounds like if you go if you go to Compass this website. You see positions open and they're in sales of strategy. You get to hang out with you a little bit throughout the year. That Z maybe, uh, Andi, who give us, um, shadows. Who do you Who do you love following talking to? Who inspires you when you you know when when you need that little extra? Listen, I love I watch CNBC all day and maybe it's a terrible thing to do, but it's the only news source to me that doesn't depress me. But I love seeing what's happening in the markets right now, and I love these companies that are coming out of nowhere just with this massive innovation. You know what Ellen is doing It Tesla's is mind blowing. What Microsoft continues to do is just meant money and not know how to do anything, but just meant its own, You know, fortune, that stuff I love.

You know, Dave Port really makes me laugh every single day with everything that's happening today. Yesterday you name it. The guy just makes me crack up. But you know these these air kind of the common things that I'm sitting and following I also would encourage people to follow the Winklevoss brothers and the way they're leading the crypto industry from a very, you know, legitimate standpoint, an institutional first standpoint, working direct with regulators. I love fintech. So to me, just seeing this stuff and I can't help but also call out Jack Dorsey, who I think has his hands full, you know, with the drama at Twitter. And I hate censorship, and I hate seeing it there. But Dan, I love what the guy does it square and have worked with him at square. He's very special entrepreneur on. I think we'll go down as one of the top entrepreneurs in the 21st century. Without a doubt, I couldn't agree more. I love a lot of those people in love. A lot of the the content that comes, comes from You got Ellen Jack and tape for my in their love it. Andi was put. I put Sasha right for Microsoft. That I think you're doing is just unbelievable again when you think about an engine revenue engine that is profitable, repeatable, predictable and scalable, Microsoft has found a way of doing it after being called dinosaur and being a label this past its prime. No, no, they're just killing it. And it's an amazing company to watch. Yeah, I like that. And what about up and comers? I know you have such an amazing team that you used to lead at square and they've gone off to all all places, you know, who are some of the folks we should kind of keep an eye out on? Yeah. I mean, I think the person who's running sales there now Ashley Greg is unbelievable and a member of revenue collective. Very active. Ashley and I get to catch up once in a while, and she is inspiring. She's great. She's absolutely great. Definitely miss working with her, the other people right underneath her square. Tom Hanrahan, who runs North American Sales, Michael Wilson runs international sales. Joey Raw to run Z Enterprise sales...

...there. Doug Schuessler, who went left and now is the C R. O of Raisi, which is a division of American Express. You know? Yeah, Ross Ross, we'd off Who's now? It's sweat ventures as, ah kind of ah, revenue mentor to start up entrepreneurs. They're they're awesome. Awesome people. Andi, Actually, someone I just hired into Compass who actually just signed his offer letter while we're sitting on this call eyes. Ah, guy by the name of Andrew Tuchman, who might be the most talented sales person I've ever met in my life on. He's now joining one of my teams at Compass. That's amazing. I know it was a maybe, and that it was like we were gonna bring it up. But there he is. Congratulated, literally. You know, I can't turn off all notifications in the background, but seeing the doc you sign come through, like way. Our breaking news here on the revenue collected podcast. Alright, cool. No, I'm a big food guy. Give us a restaurant. You gotta try. When the world comes back in New York, I cannot wait to go back to Libourne. Or then, uh, listen. It's the most consistently outstanding restaurant that will cost you a paycheck. But it is just You can't. There's nothing that beats that place. It's unreal. And I can't wait to get back. It is the place that if you want to burn 400 bucks on a meal, that is to me the most. Yeah, You said the word consistent. I might use it again. but like that's the place to go. Do it. You're gonna have a perfect meal every time. This team there is amazing. And yeah, I love it. That's great. 15, 15 years. Three Michelin star. And you look at Eric Repair, who had spent nine months straight basically making meals for homeless people and service workers and donated every dollar you know to charity. Like Justin. Amazing human being an amazing staff and not 400. But that's before wine before cocktails before tax before tip. And then you need a mortgage. You know, this is this is an international show. I didn't want to scare people up with the prices of New York City. Although, although the folks in like Hong Kong and Singapore like that's nothing, they get anyway,...

Michael. Thank you, man. Always such a great thing to catch up with you. Good luck with all the news that you have going on in your life and we'll talk to you soon. Thanks, Brandon. Always fun. Have a great week. You too. All right. That's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, please rate and review in the apple podcast or Spotify app. Send it to some friends. Smash that subscribe button. Send me some love via email, whatever you'd like. A reminder. This episode is brought to you by six cents Powered by AI and Predictive Analytics. Six cents helps you to unite your entire revenue team with a shared set of data to achieve predictable revenue growth. Had a ton of fun today. I hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers.

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