The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

Bonus Ep: Why The Future of Marketing is No Cold Calls and No Spam with Latane Conant, CMO of 6sense

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Why The Future of Marketing is No Cold Calls and No Spam with Latane Conant, CMO of 6sense

Book. Everybody. As Sam Jacobs, welcome to the revenue collective podcast. Today on the show we've got a bonus episode for you. We've got an interview with Latiney Conan, who's the chief marketing officer at an incredible company called Sixth Sense, and she actually just wrote a book and that's what we're going to be talking about. The books called no forms, no spam, no cold calls, the next generation of account bay, sales and marketing. It's a great conversation and it really exemplifies a lot of the ideas that latiny and the the company six sense have been preaching all about. How do you how do you change the buyer experience? How do you change the prospect experience, given the tools and technology that we have now? So it's a great conversation. Latin's a fantastic revene collective member, one of the CO heads of our Chicago chapter and and a great colleague and friends. So it's a really good conversation. Now, before we get there, we want to thank our sponsor. Our sponsors gone. The number one revenue intelligence platform for remote sales and Gong and revenue collective are thrill to announce a new strategic partnership or bringing you the best events, content, research and the spaces to engage with your peers. Gone is sponsoring the revenue collective podcast. This month they've got celebrate lives, so another incredible live virtual event that we're super excited about. So don't miss out. Stay up today on the latest collaborations at Gong, dot Io, forward slash RC. Now, without further do let's listen to my conversation with Latney Conan. Pay Everybody, it's Sam Jacobs, guest host on the revenue collective podcast, and I'm your guest today to bring you an interview with one of my favorite people in the world. Her name's Lattney Conan. She is the chief marketing officer at an incredible company called six CNCH, which has been a fantastic partner of revenue collective, and she is hosted webinars and talked at length about the new way that people should go to market. Let me give you her bio and then we're going to talk, because all of that, all of that work, all of that presentation, education, information that she has presented out to the global community and her marketing team has, on behalf of six sense, has culminated in a book that she's written called project bald moves. So we are going to be talking about that book, but first let me give you her official bio and reading this. Sales, accounting and consulting don't make up your typical CMO background. The Latin conent is not your typical CMO. Latiney thrives on variety challenges and working with wicked smart people, creating winning go to market strategies, effectively driving change internally and externally. Incubating a innovation, rocking a sales pitch, relentlessly watching the numbers and motivating a global team is her perfect. Typical Day at the office. Lattney was instrumental and aligning sales and marketing in a previous position at CMO Aperio, resulting in five times more effective field marketing programs and a three hundred percent increase in inbound leads. Now, as CMO Sixth Sense, Latin empowers revenue teams to compete and win in the age of account based buying through six senses solution allowing them to uncover, prioritize, in engage with demand by uniting one common aypower platform. This allows them to know everything they need to know and do anything they need to do, ultimately generating forty percent more opportunities, closing deals two times faster and winning twice as off and Latin. Welcome to the show, Sam. We got a shorten that bio. No Shita, reading what your I'm reading what your team sent me. This is what I read. I you know, I'm trying to make sure that it's a lot. It's a lot, hundred years old. I could have just said she's the sea. I could have stopped, but then, you know, you have a team of people that would get very mad at me if I did it too short. So all right, how are you? I'm awesome. It's summer in Chicago. That's that is a wonderful, beautiful you're an hour and fifteen from the lake. You just you're going ski waterskiing every weekend. It's a it's a beautiful life. Yeah, live in the dream. Basically, it's awesome. Well, I'm excited that you're living the dream. You deserve it. I want to talk today. We're going to talk about this book that you wrote, project bold moves. So I mean let's let's well, first of...

...all, for anybody that doesn't I mean I just read the background, but like, let's give you an opportunity to give the elevator pitch. You're the chief marking officers six sense. What is six sense? What do they do? What do you do? Tell us about yourself first and then we'll get into the book. Okay, sounds good. So yes, I'm the chief market officer at six sense, not marketing, and that's a there's a reason for that, but we can talk about that maybe on a different podcast or if we have time at the end. And Sixth Sense is an account engagement platform. Actually just named a leader two times, times leader for predictive analytics and what as well as ABM platforms by forester. Awesome, I know, I know, it's it's we're very blessed. We've been dropping a lot of product and it's paying off. But basically what we do is it. And Sam, you know, it wouldn't be a podcast with me if I didn't mention the dark funnel, because it's real, it's horrible, and the dial funnel. I have nightmares about the dark funnel as good. That means my marketing is worth. What's your lattiny? Marketers and sellers need to have nightmares about the dark funnel. It's where all the action is happening. Let's where buyers are doing all their research. It's where they're blowing off your emails and your calls. It's where they're probably talking to your competitor and not you, potentially, or maybe they're even on your website and you don't know it. And it's really hard to understand buying behavior in the dark funnel. And so what we do is we essentially bring together all of this data, anonymous data, non data, and we tell you exactly who is in market right now for what you do, which is pretty freaking phenomenal if you think about you know, my thirteen thousand word bio coming from sales. Like timing, is everything right. So you want to know where people are in their journey and marketing needs to understand this so that we can engage accounts with ads and webinars and podcast and all the things that we do to make sure that we're being as efficient and effective as possible. And so what's really cool about six senses a lot of people in order to do what we do, you'd have to probably buy seven or eight little point solutions to do it, and we bring it together for marketers and sellers in one platform. So that's a little bit about us. Awesome. Yeah, and let's hear about you, and again I want to. We're going to spend most of the time talking about the book. But so you're at a perio. Tell us you know where you from? We're to grow up, how GEND UP IN CHICAGO? All that stuff really quickly. So I yeah, I am from a company called a Perio, which was a very large global consulting company, but we were a little bit different and we were technology enabled services and really helped people reimagine their customer experiences and their employee experiences using cloud technology. And so I was there for almost a decade, feels like, and I actually was in sales and that's how I and I ended up in marketing because we had a gap on the on the team, and the CEO asked me to come over and help out, and it was interesting. He said, you know, I don't think you'll ever be our CMO because you don't have the background and you didn't go to school for this and your kind of a Spaz. So some so we really sold me hard on the move, but I did it anyway. And you know, it's kind of one of those things. Don't tell me what I can't do. I'm straight d' straight. So any of the rest...

...is history. Well, and a good history it is. All right. So let's talk about this book. It's called project bold moves. Know what's it called? It's called no forms, no spam, no cold calls, the next generation of account based marketing and selling. I'm sorry for referencing it as project, okay, but the reason that you're talking about that is the original project, why I decided to write the book was a project called bold moves. Okay, tell us about that. So what happened, Sam, was I came to six cents from a perio and I was had a pai of a long time and I had a lot of street cred because, you know, you work your way up in an organization. And I came to six cents and you know, there's just their seven thousand Maretech tools. Did you know that? I did not. So there's just tons of different things and and I didn't know all the seven thousand little tools that existed and I started to feel really like I was out gunned and it made a huge mistake and so I was freaking out and my crying and my husband's like, well, just focus on your strengths, and I'm like, I'm out no strengths. I don't know any of this. I don't know this industry. And then I was like wait a second, I you know, I came from this company and we really devoted ourselves to, like I said, customer experience and employee experience, and I believe in that. I believe that's what makes customer successful. And there's actually this great report, it's a little old, that forster put out about the age of the customer and and I you know whether you read that report or the hundreds others on customer experience and how that companies that focus on that profit and grow. Kind of is what it is. And I said, well, I really know that. So let me look at this Martech landscape and all these little tools and APPS and and even marketing automation, you know, the classic market on automation, and put my customer experience and Playe experience had on and apply that. And when I did that I had this real, real ground shaking moment where I realized that at you know, be tob marketers and sellers for the most part treat prospects like dirt, and that's sort of how we're set up. We're really not set up to lean in and care about their experience. Were set up to, you know, try to get their email so we can spam. And if you think about the way you go to buy Sam if you want to go buy something, you would do research right. You'd want to understand what you were buying, why you're buying it, with the reviews were. And what was the first move we make? Is we put up a form to try, you know, because we don't want you to learn, so stop that. So that's the first kind of move. I think is ridiculous. Then the second thing we do is we get your email and we just carpet bomb you with emails. Three hundred billion emails a day get set, which is insane. There's whole laws now because we've gone so cuckoo bananas with email. And then, you know, we passed these quote unquote leads to sales who looks at them with like their total junk and they've got this crappy cold territory. They don't know who's in market and they've got to go make cold calls and no one likes a cold call. So all the technology has been designed to like speed up these, I think, bad practices. And so I said, you know, this is kind of interesting. What if we said, I pulled my team together and I said, what if we went all...

...in on insights and big data and we tried to really use every signal that we have about a prospect who is a future customer and we use technology. So just lean in and create the absolute best experience that we can, and the experience our values when we think about the experience we want to create is let's try to design a process with no forms, no spam and no cold calls. And so that was the project, right. So, so it was last July. So that's going to be our project. This is going to be our mission and it'd be really cool if we all wrote about it along the way, because I'm sure it'll be an interesting ride. Will probably screw some things up, maybe we'll do some things right, and I bet people would be interested in and learning how we do with this. so that was the premise. It didn't exactly play out that way in terms of the writing, but that but that's okay. We still got the book over the line and that's that's the story that it's about and it's been pretty crazy, but it has been successful and I'm excited for the book to come out and really share this blueprint with be tob marketing teams and selling teams about how to really rethink and put prospects in the center of the experience. So if you want to do that, you want to put prospects at the center, what are the without making it, you know, like the whole thing and add for six cents. But what do you do to put the prospect of the center? How do you how do you eliminate, you know, forms and cold calls and spam and take away all of these tools that have been part of the Arsenal? What do you think the steps are to get started? Step one, get a blowtorch and torch your mqo report. Just blow the whole thing up. That's step one and that's the step that probably freaks everyone out the most. That freaks people out at now, freaks people that I know. So so, to be honest, you really don't have to do that. If you want to keep tracking mqls, you can, but the first thing to like leaning into this approach is realizing that it's okay to not value and qls and in favor of valuing things like account engagement and sing account engagement, which becomes a proxy for pipeline revenue, bigger deals, faster closed times, better close rates, and so so it's a little bit of a leave of faith at first, which is why I wanted to write the book to be able to prove how it works. But the whole reason that it's so important to kind of rethink the MQL. Is What I want you to do and what we've done is, and it does go back to the dark funnel, and maybe we can have a drinking game. You want to drink every time I say dark one? Sure I have my iced coffee in front of me, highly caffeinated by next twelve minutes. Yeah, really like jumping through the microphone. So you know, when you do uncover your dark funnel, and now it's not a big hair ball that you're just hoping to catch, you know, you're throwing a net out around this hair ball and hoping that you catch a shoe and a Kan and attire and maybe a fish. When you uncover the dark funnel, then what you see is you see accounts lit up, meaning that they're interested and you see how interested they are and you understand exactly where they are in their buying journey. In addition to that, you see who on the buying team is engaged, so you can start to understand, you know, who are the key personas that are engaging with...

...us, who are the key personas that need to be engaged? You can start to understand keywords like what what does this head of sales who we sell to care about? Okay, they're researching predictive analytics. Gosh, maybe they're worried about forecasting accuracy, for example. So you can start to see all of this rich information and ultimately, when you put that together, it allows sales and marketing teams to focus on adding value through every single step of the buying journey. And do you just to help people understand the technology behind it. What you're talking about when you talk about the dark funnel and the ability to do all of this, to generate all of this awareness, is essentially, I guess, it's cookies or pixels that you're dropping onto people's browsers, coupled with third party data access that you have through a publisher network. Walk us through a little bit of the underpinning so people just feel comfortable with it. Sure, so. So, essentially, what what you want to look for to be able to do this is the first thing is you have your own data and it's probably okay. Only thirteen percent of sales and marketers have confidence in their data, but it's better than nothing. So we want to bring all of your first party data to the table and be able to look at buying pattern so what what has happened typically before an opportunity is opened? We also look at like, for example, website activity, and most people don't know who's on their website and so we can put a tag on your website and then we can start to see, you know, who's consuming content, what content they're consuming, where they're going, pages, visits, chats to be had, all of that good rich data without them filling out a form. You can start to understand. And then the other thing is, you know they're not always going to be doing research on your website. I wish they were, right, don't we wish, but they're going to be doing other research. We you know, what you want is someone who has a really broad intent network of like of exactly what you said, be to be publishing sites that they can start to scrape that, understand keywords and then marry those keywords back to an account, and that's kind of the track. That's actually, honestly, the most tricky part. Is this this concept of account identification. So it's being able to take all of this signal, anonymous and known across all of these different properties, first property, second property and third and marry that back to an account. And different people do it different ways. The Best I always advise people to test how well a solution can do this for you, because the difference in percentage points of the ability to account identify accounts is success or failure on like a ton of different fronts. It's success or failure in terms of not missing opportunities. Right every percentage that you don't match, you're going to maybe miss an account who's in market or researching your competitor or on your website. When you think about advertising, and you know marketers spend millions of dollars advertising and targeting and it's not about the ad network, it's about making sure that the ads get served to the right accounts and that you can match and identify accounts. So tons of waste for every percentage point that someone can't match. And then, last, but certainly not least, one of the things that we talked a lot about in the book is personalization and not personalizing for like a parlor trick, like, Yay, we went to the same college. I mean it's pretty cool we did, I must say, but we're from the same hometown. That's another personalization. Yeah, so, I mean that's pretty cool and all, but we know each other. So now that's cool. You know what, when you're...

...doing outreach and you are trying to connect with a buyer, our our first priorities to add value based on what we know they care about. And so, you know, if your account identity is off, you're not going to be able to you know, if you can't match the account, if you can't match the persona, if you can't match the keyword they care about, all of a sudden this notion of putting their experience first gets harder and harder and you're kind of back to the form spam and coal calls. Yeah, that's it's true. You know, you mentioned you were joking about it torching the MQL report, but I think there are so many marketers out there that have grown up thinking that you know, their work is to get a ton of people to fill out forms and then to rate those fill outs based on the criteria that they understand, and then to deliver as out of mqls to the sales team that can then hopefully be turned into pipeline, an opportunity. What do you think the problem is with with mqls? The problem with the MQO is one it is for a contact or a person, and today in B to be buying, it's not a contact, it's a buying team, and so it only to it's typically taking into account the research and activity of one person. Okay, so that's the first problem and what you want to be able to do is look at the entire buying team and every additional member of the buying team that's doing research. You know, you want to be able to understand that. So that's that's the first problem. A lot of times lead scores do take into a consideration fit. So that's good, because you want, you know, you want to make sure that you're passing or, you know, focused on accounts that are in your ICP. So that's kind of table stakes. Layer on, like I said, the activity across the buying team. That's critical and that's worth scoring. Like lead scoring, typically really falls down. Another aspect of where leads got scoring really falls down is it requires someone to raise their hand. So when you do that it feels good because it's like, oh, they're ready. They told me that they're ready. Sam just filled out my form. And what one of two things I think happens in this scenario. Scenario one, is you really do just want this new forester wave that came out. You're just interested. You're asn't mean you're ready to buy right, you're just interested in what's going on in the market, and so I am getting a false positive and potentially turning you off by launching the dethracky to email you and call you right and you're like, I just kind of wanted to learn, right. So that's scenario one with the lead score. Scenario to with the lead score is we get so excited about demo request or contact us, hot inbound, right, oh my gosh, hot and bound, it's coming in. We'll guess what that means. We were too late, because I'm telling you, they're not just getting a demo from you, they're getting a demo from five or six other people, and the reality is there's a moment in time if you look at the way customers by right now there's what we call target, and in target their under rock. They're not doing any research. You know, I don't have enough money to market to the people in target, so I don't spend any energy on them. When they move to awareness, they're researching like their problem. They're probably not researching maybe you or your competitive name or competitor's name or like specific solutions, but they're researching more like generic things like maybe abm or pipeline generation, things like that. They're trying to fit, they're trying to research their problem. Then they start researching more like specific keywords and they want to learn, but they go from they go pretty quickly from a phase...

...where they want to learn to they want to where they want to engage, and they don't want to necessarily engage with every vendor, but they do want to engage with two or three and that's like that's like a sweet spot and we want to be, you know, I want my cellars to be the first people in that pocket. And so that's why when I talk about ditching the MQLS, it's not to have nothing. I'm saying rather than focus on an Mql, let's focus on this in market score, which takes into account accountfit, contact fit, the relationship of the buying team, recency and frequency of activity so that you know that they're actually ready. And so that's like a key leading indicator. Now that's still not how I measure myself. It's not like I go into a board meeting and I'm like, Yeay, me, give me a pat on the back, I got a bunch of accounts in market, because it's a leading indicator and it puts my sales and bedrs like in the pocket in the you know, I we were talking about surfing earlier in the barrel of the wave, but that's still not the end goal. And so, you know, it's about kind of looking andten holistically at the prospect to customer life cycle and understanding where they are, understanding their signal and ensuring, like marketing is informing and part of that entire life cycle. To exactly to your point about measuring, because I was sort of one of the questions I had. Do you believe in this new world, do you think marketers? I guess I have just general do you believe that marketer should have you know, meaningful compensation that is variable as opposed to just base salary. And you think that variable compensation? Should it be revenue? Should it be pipeline generated? Where do you want to be measured? To your point about, you know, in market as a leading indicator, it's not the ultimate indicator. Where do you think you want your successor failure to be determined? It's always about compensation for you, Sam. It's about measure are met, it's about measurement. It's not a really about compensation. is about value creation. That's why I'm asking, actually, because I don't believe. I think variable compensation is is dramatically over emphasized in like the world, I think, and I also think very specialized complants are dramatically over emphasized. And but that's just me. You know. I think that most executive should probably just be comped on like did we hit the number, all of us, and then we should all get, you know, twenty percent bonus and if we didn't, we shouldn't. But that's me. What do you think? Why don't I give you my process and what I measure and then I'll talk about camp? Sure, and I were, but again, we can separate, we can and you can separate comp completely. I'm more just interested in how do you if you want to go into the board room and pound your chest and say I fucking kicked ass, what number do you want to point to? But yeah, so give me your process. Okay. So, first of all, I think it, and member at the beginning when I talked about like it's not a chief marketing officer, it's a chief market officer. That is to me an important distinction, because marketing signals. I made fifty five blogs and I got a bunch of mqls and I updated the website and then another that level. I wrote a press release and I did another right and wow, we do all of that Shit, believe me, and then some. I think that the seat at the table that people want filled is someone who understands the market and brings the perspective of the market. And so when I, you know, present to the board, my first few slides have nothing to do with my funnel, nothing to do with conversions. It's always here's what's happening in our market, here's our position in our market, here's where I think we need to be and why, you know, and...

...it's always like a market update and I think that that's a pretty important distinction, for like in the difference between like a marketing vp or a head of demand Jin and a CMO. And so this is a little bit of a Sidebar, but I think it's important because then all of a sudden you're elevated and you're not just talking about MQLS. that. Then the next thing that I go into is, you know, I have, I'm lucky in that a gentleman came from a perio and I worked with before and he's in revenue ops, and so we have this revenue operating model, though we've built over two companies and too many years, and you know, we're able to see basically where what I call the red is. So, you know, together with the the CS leader and the head of sales, we put together our revenue operating model. What are we to assume? How much we to do an up cells? What's our renewal rights going to be? which our average deal size? What's our cycle time? Let's win rates. There's like seven or eight key conversion points that we make assumptions on, and that is what I must maniacally look at, because the reality is a couple points here. They're on on something like a win rate or a critical conversion is going to have a lot more impact down the line on revenue than five or six more mpls. So yes, I am at the top end responsible for moving accounts from awareness and consideration, moving them into market, progressing them and getting them to what we call Stage two, which is quality, which is qualified pipeline. So that is my goal, that's my dashboard, that's how I'm compensated, that's how my team is compensated. But ultimately what I'm looking at is that entire cycle and all of those assumptions, because I know if one goes sideways, marketing has a tremendous ability to impact it for the positive, and so I call that finding the red and so my when I build our calendar and what we what we put in market every quarter, I'm looking at where we read across the business that we need to put effort forth, that marketing is going to support as well as our pipeline targets, and that those those things combined to give me kind of my agenda, and that's when I report out to the board. Is, you know, here was the agenda that we had. Here is here's we're read and what I wanted to fix it. Here's how that happened and here's kind of the dynamics of our pipeline and how it's doing. And the red is sort of emerging from your operating Midele saying, you know, our conversion from discovery to, you know, demo is x percent. We want to improve that to why percent, stuff like that. Exactly, exactly, you know, we assumed this average deal size and, Gosh, you know, we went. We've seen a real uptake in our commercial segment, which is great, but our average deal size is lower, so that means we need to blah blah, blah, Blah Blah, except, you know. Yeah, so it's more about, I think, unifying, like like unifying the executive team and understanding, having a lot of clarity on that so that everyone knows where you're focused and why. I love that. We've got a few more minutes and I want to just I want to I don't want to make it a book, by the way, I was getting back to them. So it is. It is. There's a whole chapter. I have I have a template for the revenue operating model. I have the whole finding the red process. I have how you build a go to market plan. So don't worry, I'm not worrying. Yea, I have complete and an utter confidence in you and faith are you. That's what it's a party of one. WHO's the publisher? Is at Wiley? Who's going to publish this beautiful book? Six Sense? Oh, awesome,...

...okay, published, yes, wonderful. And tell us about just a little bit about the process of writing the book. You said it nearly killed you. Why is that? Don't do it. Tell me more. I think I mean Sam. You know me by now a little bit, but I like I don't have a great ability to do things a little bit, and one of my favorite sayings is anything we're doing is worth overdoing, and so I probably overdid it a little bit, but I just found that for the last six months it's always been there, it's always been in the back of my mind. So, whether I'm, you know, in a meeting at work, I'm with my team, I'm with my family, I'm with friends, I was always obsessing about the next paragraph, the next chapter, the next framework that I thought I needed to put in it, and it just never went away and it almost makes you like recluse in a weird way, because you're sort of always in your own head with this hamster running for this project. So I feel like I'm so like I just feel a lated now that it's done. It's almost like a pregnancy. Yeah, yeah, it's like it's it is. It's like this obsession, you know, and it and you know, I had a full time job, not that the book won't be like Awesome for Sissons, but you know, when you're on calls and meetings, writing is a very at least for me. So so I wouldn't I was a major in accounting and in the comschool because I never wanted to write a paper because I saw at writing so um. So I had to really dig deep. And don't worry, I had an editor. So it won't be it'll it's pretty, it's okay. But it wasn't an easy thing and for me personally, and so I had to like basically hunker down every weekend and just did you write? You wrote on the weekends. Yeah, did you every weekend, both days? Crank, crank. Could you have a word count target? No, no. The weird thing is the story was in there, like I wanted to say. I knew what I wanted to say, like I wasn't like, Oh, what am I not like? I knew that like chapter one needed to be this chapter to it was just a matter of like getting it right and and making it interesting. And you know, I didn't. I don't want another boring business book. So I had to bring some personality to it. And then I think people like tactics, so I also wanted to have a lot of like frameworks and hey, here's an example so and be usable, like that's the kind of book I want. And and well, I yeah, I agree one hundred percent with you and I think, you know, we're recording this in June, but I think we're going to release it in time with the book launch and I think revenue collective executive members get a free copy, if I'm not mistaken. They do. They do. I'm exciting, very cool. I'm excited. Hopefully, you know, people like it. I'm sure they will. I'm sure they will. I'm not subject. You know, one of the things I'm going to I'm going to flip it a little bit, but it is. It is the revenue collective podcast and we've got a bunch of new members. Many people are joining and I think the common piece of like constructive, neggetive. Feedback I'm hearing is there's just so much to consume, so much to do. Where do I start? And so the question I want to ask you, you know, towards the end now, is, you know, you've mentioned that revenue collective has been a positive influence on you. has had a positive impact. How do you use revenue collective as a CMO at a super high growth company, two kids, writing a book, when you think about, if you're an if you were brand new to...

...this community, how you should take advantage of it? What's your recommendation to new members? That is a really good question. I think you have to plug in with what makes sense for you and what makes sense for your life and this Sam you might not like this, what everything I'm saying here, but for me in my life, for example, I told you I'm not too into email. I have Thirtyzero, two hundred and fifty seven unready emails right now. I'm looking at it right now. That's a tremendous number. So I I'm glad you send the updates and this and that, but I don't look at those at all and I don't even stress about it. I can't too much you know a lot of people love the sprint series. But again, for me, like I'm pretty much back to back to back from you know, seven to six every day. So where I like love to plug in, honestly, is the slack channel and you know, every like I'm watching homeland and I'm I fire and I just sometimes I don't. I just want to see what other people are doing and comment and plug in. And I've got a call with someone later tonight WHO's working on some analyst relation stuff and I said, Hey, just give me a call later. And so to me like just keeping it really informal and that's a great way to participate, but very much on your terms. And it can be on the weekends or at night, which is really one a lot of us have free time, and it's just been phenomenal. So that has been great for me. I really want to do events again. You know, I love throwing parties and through a great party. So that's just sucks. This sucks. So that's going to be a big way I plug in. Is, you know, I wanted to try every great restaurant in Chicago with my red with my Chicago revenue collective chapter. I think that's a great goal to have. It is an admirable but we need a vaccine first. But yeah, or something, something. Yeah, the numbers are going in the wrong direction right now. By the way, I'm not offended at all. I mean, just so you understand, it's kind of the point, you know, the point of flooding the zone, so to speak, with like emails and slacks and kind events and sprint series and podcasts is that everybody's busy and everybody has time when they have time, and so I just want to reach people where they prefer to be reached. There're certain people that love email, they're certain people love slacked. There certain people, frankly, they're never going to say a damn thing, but they love the reports that we generate, the research that we generate through our benchmarking survey. And so to your point, I'm not offended at all, and that's again, that's what I think people need to just know, like wow, I can do all of the things or one of the things. You know, you're right and we I'll do a better job of making sure that that's communicated. To let you down, Sam well, you know what that's. That's I don't mind that. That's always a powerful place to be. It is, it is. It's a get. Do you give people a gift of high expectations? I'll there you go, Latin. It's been awesome having you on the show. CONGRATS on the book. So just tell us the title again so we know we can look out for it. No forms, no spam, no cold calls, the next generation of account byased sales and marketing. And if they're not a revenue collective executive member and they want to purchase the book, will it be on Amazon? Yep, Amazon Paperback Kindle, and I'll probable I'm in have it on audible, but I I've got to get that recording done still. So, Oh my God, maybe I'll read it for you. Oh my God, try to be that would be funny, awesome. And if folks want...

...to reach out to you right now, you know what's the best way to get in touch if they are, I'm sure lots of people are, interested in in what you talked about today and moving away from Mq I was moving towards a more prospect friendly strategy and how to instrument that, how to build pot how to use frameworks and all of the things in the book. So let's say they want to talk to the author of the book. Are you open to that? For people listening, what's the best way to reach out? Of course, and you can find me in remnew collectors slack. You can email me latiny dot con and at Scom, although I kind of said I suck at that. Linkedin in mail. Lots of ways, lots of ways. Definitely reach out. Awesome, Latiney. Thanks so much for being on the show and thanks to six cents and you for your support, your constant and enthusiastic support a revenue collective over the years. It's been awesome to get to know you better. All Right, talk to later, Sam okay, lattey. Thank you, Hey folks, hope you enjoyed a great conversation with Latiney Conan. Really, really always love hearing from latiny and so impressed that she wrote this incredible book. The book again, is called no forms, no spam, no cold calls, the next generation of account bay, sales and marketing. Pick it up at Amazon. It's officially out, I believe, July twenty two, so any day now, but you can download a free chapter if you go to Scom for resources for LP forward slash, no forms, no no spam, no coal. Just go to Scom, email latiny if you can't get it. But we're also going to be giving away free copies of the book to revenue collective members, so stay on the lookout for that. But we're really excited to earn the show and thanks to Gong. Gong has been an incredible partner and they are sponsor for July for the revenue collected podcast. We're so grateful to their support. We'll talk to everybody next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (272)