The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 11 months ago

Ep 86: Bad Luck is the Best Luck w/ Collin Cadmus

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 86: Bad Luck is the Best Luck w/ Collin Cadmus

Part of the "Is This a Good Time?" series hosted by Brandon Barton.

Hello everyone and welcome back to the Revenue Collective podcast. I am your host, Brandon Barton and you are listening to Is this a good time? The show where I asked Revenue Collective members some really basic questions. They answer those questions and it's a lot of fun. We really shows every Tuesdays and thursday. So just hit subscribe. So you don't miss an episode. Our guest today is Colin Cadmus. He is a two time VP of sales who now is an adviser, consultant. Too many companies but also has his own podcast. We talk about how bad luck can really be beneficial. Sometimes this episode was brought to you by Quarter Bath, a commission tracking software built for sales operations, finance and accounting teams. If running commissions and payroll has you running for the hills quota path is for you, quote a path helps organizations track and manage commissions and paid their teams accurately. And on time every time, keep your team motivated and on target. Simplify your commissions at quarter past dot com slash revenue collective. That is revenue dash collective. And give your reps the gift...

...of transparency. All right, let's do this episode 34. Is this a good time? Alright. I'm so psyched to have our guest today, Colin Cadmus. He's a former VP of sales two times done that. He's an entrepreneur, he's an advisor now. He has his own podcast, so he is going to sound a lot better than I do with all his fancy equipment Colin Great to have you man. Likewise, thanks to be here and thanks for inviting me. Yeah, well look, I'm really intrigued by your background and I mean it's not only to where you got, how you got to where you got, but now have you gotten past it? Right. You're at the point where you are, you know, almost making your own career out of out of you, right? You're the brand. So, all meat, No fillers want to die, right? And tell us a little bit of your current kind of role, what you're doing and then how you got here some of the steps along the way. Sure. Yeah. So currently, uh, I guess I'm going on, I'm probably approaching a year maybe it hasn't been quite that long, but it feels like that long. It's probably like six months, I think. I don't even know, but I I left being a VP of sales rough. I call it a...

...year ago, maybe it was a year, you know, around covid time and now I'm consulting, you know, I always had this dream to work for myself. Maybe it's not a dream more of a need, I think. Yeah, never, never been a huge fan of working for other people, even though I loved it through my career, I knew it wasn't what I wanted to do forever. And so I had, kind of, throughout my whole career, tried to find my way to, you know, self employment or entrepreneurship, I had tried to start my own tech company after my first VP of sales role failed miserably in eight months and, you know, decided to go back and do what I knew I was good at, went back to the V. P. Of sales again, then came to the end of that road and again, I'm like, I really want to work for myself, you know? And so at that point I had built up a bit of a following on linkedin. I had obviously some better credentials at that point, after being a VP of sales twice, I felt like I had learned a lot in it and after doing it twice I felt like I had a much more holistic view of what it really is because you do it once and you kind of get tunnel vision, you go...

...to a slightly different or very different company and all of a sudden you start to really understand what the job is at large. So that's where I realized, you know, consulting might be a good thing for me. And so, you know, it was kind of a mixed bag of emotions. One was, you know, and I was very public about this. I got fired from my job at air call. As many VPs of sales do even after you do a good job. You're going through a certain stage and then they move on to someone who knows the next stage. And so I think there's some things that are right with that. I also think that there's some things that are broken with that model. And so what I realized after I left air call, I start talking to some folks who are recruiting VPs of sales, trying to recruit me. And I realized that a handful of them weren't actually ready to hire a VP of sales, but they thought they were. And if they had gone ahead with that higher, they're going to end up, you know, just contributing to that short tenure of a VP of sales, just contributing to that heavy turnover. And that that horrible issue of just cycling sales leaders in and out. And so I said, maybe what I should do with my life is actually try to help solve a...

...little bit of that problem, right? Maybe I go the consulting route. I take phone calls with Ceos and founders who think they're ready to hire a VP and I help them assess whether or not they are and if they're not ready, that's where I can come in and bridge that gap. Right? And help them get ready for that point. And that's essentially what I'm doing on the consulting side of the business today and consulting advising depending on how deep the engagement is. But that's essentially what I'm doing. And then I'm doing a podcast as well to help promote the business and help me network and stuff like that on the other side of the business, which should turn out to be about 50% of my time, is building online training courses being I guess like in my own house now, working every day, I'm like, I've been training salespeople for all these years and now if I consult and kind of never get to do that again. So why don't I just document everything I have and just put it out there for people, you know, and then you can have these multiple revenue streams and and kind of hopefully survive without having to go back to that full time job.

I love that. And tell us the name of the podcast so people can find it Colin Cadmus podcast. It's funny to ask. Yeah, so my business is called Colin Cadmus LLC. My website is Colin Cadmus dot com. My podcast is Colin Cadmus podcast. Why did I do that? Because I couldn't think of anything better and I didn't want to waste any time on it. I'm glad your parents named you. That would be really weird if all those things for your businesses and your names and that wasn't your name. So uh it's going to be needing Jose. Well look, I I always think success and comes from both hard work and luck along the way uh would love to hear, you know, a story of either from you kind of along your path. Sure. Yeah. The way I saw that question right? Like and I didn't agree with it at first, I don't know that success is built on luck now. It doesn't mean that luck can't play a role, right? It doesn't mean that there can't be part of that and perhaps a lot of people's success, maybe that's what you meant by...

...that. Perhaps a lot of people's success, there's there's some luck and you know, the thought is that that wouldn't have happened. You know, if the timing wasn't right or if the company who just bought your company for a billion dollars wasn't in the market for that, right? Some of that could be considered luck. But I think the other way to look at it is that you created that look by putting yourself in that position. But anyway, that's kind of the generic answer. But I think for me when I think about what helped me get to where I'm at today, and not that I don't feel like I still have a much farther to go, but it's almost like bad luck has been more beneficial to me I've found in my life and I wish I realized this, you know, 10, 15 years ago when I went through the first downward spiral of my adult life. But I've learned now that those are actually the greatest opportunities for me because I go through that little point of depression and getting upset over whatever happened. But then that turns into fuel and and that really pushes me to level up and so, you know, it's how I've gone from being a store manager to then, you know, nine months later after starting at an entry level role, getting into...

...leadership and then getting into a VP sales, getting fired from that, getting to another VP sales like, and and just continuing to let those downfalls be a springboard and that's how I like to think about it. You think about those springboards that gymnasts jump on, right. The thing has to go all the way down before it can go up and so it's like life and careers. I like that man. Well look, you've trained hundreds and hundreds of salespeople. Give us a tactic that you think each one of them should have learned in your training and used in their everyday work. Sure. Yeah, So it's probably different depending on which company I trained people at. Um Sure. For two reasons. One because I think I got better at it. Uh and to just because each company is different. But I think one thing that you can probably say is universal, it's just putting the customer first, the customer or the prospect, right? And if you do that and you let that be the foundation of everything else that you're doing, the whole job gets a lot easier, right? And I think, you know, if you start out in an entry level role, you go through this training and you're...

...often 90 of what you're being told or all of the things that you have to do. Okay, so your mindset becomes focused on what I have to do, not what I need to accomplish, right? And they're different. And so when you're focused on the task, you're not focused on the results. And when you start to put the customer ahead of everything right? Or let me back up a little bit so I can make sure following me. If I'm in that mindset of focusing on what I have to do, I'm thinking today I have to hit 100 cold cause I have to schedule x number of meetings. I have to make sure that I check all these things off the list. So when that dashboard comes out, that report, whatever it is, I look like I did my job. But the problem is when you approach it from that angle, that is your end goal is just to get it done. But you're not actually accomplishing what you need to accomplish. And so when you can think about the customer first instead of your number, your commission, you're this, you're that and then you get laser focused on actually trying to...

...find people that need what you have and then helping them to understand that they need it. When you put that first, when you put that above everything, all of the rest starts to work itself out and actually gets a lot easier. I think interesting. I wonder if folks put that into practice? Does that start to have conflict on, you know, the hitting the goals versus get, you know, hey, I'm thinking of the customer first, but like, well, guess what, internally, you're not hitting the goals, you need to, have you ever seen that kind of situation? Sure. Maybe initially when you're going through that transition. But the truth of the matter is if you're not doing it that way, your metrics don't mean much because you could be bringing in bad business, you could be making bad cold calls that are a waste of time, right? You're just doing things for the sake of doing them. And if you don't focus on the results, the results probably won't be that good, right? And you see, you see there's there's companies that are crushing their sales targets, but their turn is atrocious, right? And like it's different things like that that all come back to you didn't put the customer first, right? And, and that...

...mindset, I love getting rid of vanity metrics in this industry. Um Yeah, look, they're cool to look at such bullshit. They're cool to look at their directional. But here's the problem with when they become the main focus, then everyone finds a way to manipulate the numbers and then they're really not telling you the truth anyway. And so when you pay a little bit less attention to that and all of the focus of the team, the energy, the culture is on. Just figuring out how to find the right people find the right prospects and then how to turn them into a happy customers. When you make that, the number one overarching objective of the whole thing, it all gets a lot easier and it starts with the ceo it starts with the ceo the CFO the co founders. When you see a company who's making all of their decisions based around finance, that's usually a very bad sign. And what I mean by that is if you're sitting in an executive meeting and we're talking about different ideas, right? We're throwing out different strategies. May be different tests this and that. And the first reaction to most people in the room is something...

...about the budget, the cost of this that you are not running a company for your customers, You're running it for your bank account. But then you look at a company like amazon, for example, who has never thought that way. Not once, right. They've always always put the customer first whether that means taking a billion dollars worth of fraudulent returns every year. Just so that the you know the other, I don't know million dollars worth of those customers were legitimate returns. Have a good experience, right? Little things like that. And the translated translates into SAS as well. And it's something that I try to coach ceos on. It doesn't mean don't make decisions around financing. You have to you don't want to go bankrupt. But it means before you think about the financial impact of that decision, try to think about the customer impact first. And if you think about that first, you have a whole new perspective on the financial impact because now you're thinking about the ancillary benefits of making that investment. Whereas if your first...

...reaction is to look over your CFO say can we afford that? Of course they're gonna say no because you haven't even thought through all of the upside yet. And so that's why I say the customer first mentality. It should start at the top from the ceo down it should trickle down to marketing to sales to see us to product to everyone if you do that and that's the culture of the company, everyone's jobs a lot easier. Cool. I like it man. Let's let's leave it there. Alright, lightning round. We got a couple couple of quick ones. Anything you're hiring for. Not really hiring but I am looking for it's more of a freelance. I'm looking for like a really talented videographer video editor on the content side. Someone who ideally I could find someone local to me so you could actually shoot some stuff in person. But yeah I've been looking for someone, we get lots of people reaching out, but I really want someone who, who really has experience, not someone who is just, you know, I mentioned, I mentioned before my, my, my guy Gary V, you need you need a D rock. Yeah, that's exactly what I need and it's not full time. Right? Well,...

...let's, we'll ping him after the show and we'll see, uh, if he's got anybody else in his, he usually doesn't, but everyone, I'm sure he wants to leave Gary V to come to come over here. Right. Exactly. Exactly. But yeah, I would like to have someone like that, not full time or anything like that, but someone who's looking to pick up some extra money, you know, every month and do some work with me. That would be great. Cool. And give some shout outs who are the people that you appreciate, their content, that they're putting out on sales and marketing. It's such a tough question because there's so many and I think I go through phases of like who I'm really into their content but I mean look all the O. G. S, right, Jake Dunlap scott lease, I'm gonna forget so many people scott leaves richard Harris, josh braun is great on the marketing side, I'll give you the top three, right? It said steve, gerhard chris walker and Megan Bowen Bowen Bowen, I actually don't know if I said that right, I apologize Megan. But yeah, I would go follow those fucks. All...

...amazing folks had chris on here and Megan is just Megan has been on the R. C. Podcast in the past, not mine but uh she is, she's incredibly special. I was on Megan's podcast also in actually two hours ago, I was just on christmas podcast. So small world got to you got to give them the shouts too. I love that. Alright, cool, well look, this has been great. The real important question to me is straightforward. Where am I eating man? Give me, give me a restaurant to go to. Oh man, I mean for me it's mom's home cooking. I'll give you a good restaurant, I'll give you my favorite in new york city. I mean my favorite has always been morton's steakhouse. Actually lived a block away from morton's steakhouse for eight years. Nothing beat that, that 12 ounce filet, the God, I forget even what they called, the mashed potatoes. I got a cream corn there, it's unbelievable, but that's my favorite. But hey, I just moved back to New Jersey after what was it? I think 17 years of not living near my parents, so there's nothing going grab mom's dinner. I can't get that. But I definitely could go to morton's. I love it, Colin. Thank you so much for being on man. Good luck with your pod. Really looking...

...forward to continue listening to all the killer. Amazing folks that you had on there And uh, yeah, thanks for being on. Thank you. All right. That's our show. Thank you so much for listening. If you love the show, send it to everyone posted on your instagram every day all week. This episode was brought to you by a quarterback, quarterback. This differs radically transparent. End to end compensation solution from sales reps, defiance. Get started for free at quarterback dot com slash revenue dash collected. I had a lot of fun today. I hope you did too. Now go crush your numbers. Say something. Mhm.

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