The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 206: All Things AdTech & Sales w/ James Cavalier

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Ep 206: All Things AdTech & Sales w/ James Cavalier 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Fright everybody. Welcome back to the pavilion podcasts. This is your host, Tom Lamo, and this is the show where revenue leaders learned the tips, tricks and tactics they need to be successful in their roles. Thank God it's Monday. I've got a great interview today with James Cavalier. James as an ad tech and brand junkie. He's father, semi pro golfer, loves the beach. He runs cavalier consulting. He's been doing that for about five years, where he is a sales and Growth Consultant, advisor Mentor to, you know, dozens of different clients over the years. He's obviously a member of pavilion right now. He's an investor, formerly ahead of sales over at thesis, and it wasn't in the sales game quite a bit before that. So we go all over the board on this one with James and have a great conversation and just a fun one. Man, I enjoyed talking to James. I could have talked to him for even longer, but I think you're really going to enjoy this one. You're going to learn from it. You might laugh a couple times. James asn't take himself too seriously, which I appreciate. A quick note before we get to the conversation. First, you can please add me on Linkedin. My name is Tom lemo and if you're interested in sales, I do have a podcast called millennial sales that you can check out. It's focused on young salespeople and trying to invest their career year. And before we get to James, the last message is a quick, very quick, probably seventeen seconds, word from our sponsor and then we'll get you straight to that interview. All right, this episode is brought to you by said Doso, the leading corporate gifting platform that inspires human connections for revenue driven teams to stand out at strategic points to the customer journey and check them out at said DOSOCOM now back to the show. All right, James Cavalier, coming in hot from the beautiful state of Florida. How are you, man? I'm doing well, Tom Thanks for having me. I'm excited to have this Combo. We just chat it for a good twenty minutes. We didn't even realize we weren't recording. We had a great conversation. Will try to replicate some of that for the people, but nonetheless excited to have you on the actual podcast. Now there's a lot I want to get to with you, from, you know, AD tach to the world of sales right now. What's been changing, things like that. But you hinted at a story earlier that I want to peel back the onion, which is your first sales job at the age of six. So I'd love right, I'd love to dig into that to kick this off. Yeah, so, you know, I i. I know we just went over this because we spent twenty minutes, or I spent Twenty Min saying this was the podcast. But, but, but I love it. It got me warmed up, which I like.

So yeah, so I started selling when I was, yeah, I was about six, five or six, something like that. My Dad owns an outdoor will clothing company called King in the mountain. Basically, if you if you are a hunter that spends their time outside, you you know King of the mountain. You wear it last forever. I still have some from when I was a kid right like my kids have worn it like that's how good of gear it is. Never been cold. But I started selling at the age of yes, but six, at trade shows like outdoor sportsmen trade shows at a booth for my dad, and it was always great because, you know, I'd always out sell my dad because, you know, here I am this cute little blond kid, you know, selling, you know, eight hundred dollar wool jackets two guys my dad's age, you know, and it taught me very early on about, and I think my dad was always good at this too, about caring about the other person more than you care about yourself. Right, so it's never your features and benefits and all of that kind of stuff. It's it's what's their problem and how do you solve it with your solution, right, which is obviously very basic sales. But I think, I think a lot of that got disconnected when tech and outreach tools and things like that came around. I think we lost the relationship and I think, I think for a lot of sales people listening to this that you know, especially the good ones, you know building that relationship is is the most important thing, whether you're just getting started or if you've been doing this for twenty years, you have to you have to build and maintain those and I think covid was a was a great eye opener to that for a lot of these sales structures that are highly tool focused that aren't seeing the results that they used to. So you you you kind of sputtered off at one point before the recording that you think, beccause of all that cold email and cold calling, are dead. Did you say the word dead? Are they dead or they dying? Not Dead. They're they're not even making it to people's inboxes. You know, like I being the go between the as a consultant, which is which has been fun, between Ad Tech and brands, is, you know, really building the relationship with some of these marketers is you know, they get they get inundated by five, six hundred emails a day and most of them they're like, oh no, it a'll just goes to my spam, like I don't even see it, especially if they just spam you right away, like if they don't know you, those hit reports, Bam and I'll never see it again. So you so the next nine that you send they're never going to see. A lot of companies have gotten smart about tracking pixels, pixels that track opens and devices and links, etc. A lot of spam filters is automatically sort those out. So a lot of this old emails star or it just just cold tools or automated tools.

I feel are done. You know, I still get them. I just immediately realy sent them a spam. Don't even read it, you know, because I don't know you. I don't know to talk about you. Would have a much better chance taking my phone number off of Linkedin and calling me any day. But I'll answer the phone. I always answer my phone unless my phone says spam. Likely, you know. But I think, I think covid really opened a lot of people, especially decision makers, minds to what they really want in their lives. And you know, it's people that are that are going to actually care not only about them but also that the partnership that they're trying to build. Cold calling is not dead, absolutely not. I could call people all the time. You know. Maybe I haven't talked to him in six months, but you know, just hey, what's update, you know, and there's so many tools out there to find cell phone numbers and stuff, I got these days, that you are way more likely to get a hold of somebody that's actually going to listen to you by make by taking the leap and putting yourself out there to do it. Absolutely do you think that this is relatively like progressed a lot more quickly because of covid and because everyone else is, you know, all the new text like all the new tech tools and outreach tools and things like that, or has this been like steadily progressing? Or do you feel like covid is really kind of like double down on like how bad of an issue this is? From what you think, I think it. I think it pointed out just how bad of an issue it really is, but also the same time, like I don't think any I don't know if it's ever really worked, you know, and in the last five years right, like you know, I I've set up on a five or six clients on outreach and no offense outreach. Those are awesome offense many of the man but and automating the process as not Gott them anywhere, you know, to the point where like we've gone back to the drawing board. I'm like, guys, higher strs, hire people that are going to make the calls, go do more things. Sponsor the virtual conference is ridiculous. As a towns, you know, do something, do something right other than just automate stuff. So, you know, it's definitely one of those things where I think everybody's wizened up to just how it's supposed to be done and you know it's always going to go back to that empathetic cell. Absolutely so. Do you think there's a way that you can use those tools as an empathetic seller and customize them enough where it's still kind of breaks through? Do you think if someone sees that this came from a sequence like in general, that's just a turnoff, regardless of what the message is all about, because there's some good emails that come from those and...

...there's some terrible, and probably most of them are terrible emails. Is there such thing as a good email just in general? Just in general, I think we get enough from now like. Is there such thing as like when we're like, this is the best email I've ever seen? Yeah, right, run from the bank. You got paid today. Yes, that's a good email. Okay, sure, maybe one from your mom, you know, telling you she loves you or whatever, like yeah, all my mom knows email me that she calls and leaves a voicemail for fifteen minutes. Sorry, listening this mom, and then you call her back. A troupies the same thing. You might as well do that as a seller. You know, one interesting thing too about cold calling. That that I hope this brings this back right like. If anything I hope anybody out there listening to this is get back on the phone, you know, find find a way to reach somebody that's not an in dating their inbox or their Linkedin inbox or whatever, and there's tons of cool ways to do this. You know, one of my clients post click, you know, they they started like sending out gifts, you know, like here's a hundred, but like, you know, what's your home email? Said, what's your home address? I'm to send you a gift. Send them a gift to like. All we want is a thirty minute call to blow you away. They're tripled their team and revenue in the last eighteen months. What kind of heils? So they send it. Yes, this is like a fifty our gift card, Amazon Gift Card, or if somebody want to like, you know, those chocolate coated strawberries. I mean, you did any of them. I can't remember the company that they went through to do it, but they handled all the processing and stuff like that. So you just had to get the address and it work phenomenally well. But also, at the same time, like I know people that are like the I hate sequences that everybody knows. Okay, everybody knows they're in a sequence if they're getting them over and over for Akin, especially if the company name still has like LLC at the end. You know, so it's autoloading. Yeah, yeah, those are I get them on on Linkedin. It's like we really like your experience at Ad Tech Brand Junkie and your role as consultant at Taveler Consulting. I'm like, okay, nobody types this way. But the cool thing about cold calling is everybody reads their voice mails now. HMM. But if you think about it, like, if it doesn't transcribe, I probably won't listen to it for a good couple of days sometimes, you know. So he to keep it, keep it short enough that you can read it actual exactly. A nun see eight, say your name clear really, say why you're calling and very clearly state your...

...phone number and stated again, because then it spells it out in there and they can literally just click on it and call your back right back. HMM. But if you leave a two and a half minute ramble, it's going to read like voice to text yeah, you know, like in you're in your car and you try to do a voice to text and then you look at it like what's the hell, like another language? That's not even close to what I said. You know, great sales tactic. Yeah, one of those, one of those things that a lot of people just don't think of, especially for calling, because somebody cell phone and nobody was in the office for a long time. So cold calling, you had to call people cell phone. You you know, one thing you mentioned before we started recording, and we're kind of getting at the heart of this now, is that, you know, it felt like covid kind of maybe woke the world up, the sales world up, to like bring empathy back into the sale and that's been one of the you know, the strong suits that you've had from, you know, the day one of selling. You know, those those wool jackets. What other parts of you know, if we take out the kind of like the sequence, the cold email stuff, like, what parts of the sales process do you think? You know, like in general sales people can can get better from an empathy perspective or that you see is usually like a kind of a red flag when you go in and as a consultant somewhere. Yeah, you know, there's there's we can talk about this for hours. You know, the biggest this is probably being you know, have a very clear agenda and stating the purpose of that agenda has been amazing for me and others for for as long as I've been doing right. So care about yourself in the beginning to drive the conversation right. So here's our agenda. You know, this is why I wanted to talk to you today at the end of this call. This is the next step or objective that I am looking for right and I want to know more about this issue that I know you guys are having. You did your research, you know who you're talking to, right, and and then just asking questions. And that is what the empathetic cell is right is it's asking questions, getting them talking about themselves, mirroring that and asking another really good question. Right, you can get really far doing this, and and it makes them feel like they're running the conversation right, but also the same time you're getting all of the information you could ever want more without ever showing a deck, without ever presenting a slide or even opening a demo. You know. You know I have one call clothes so many times I can't even count it. So, yes, the other thing to savior. Savior decks for call like three. You would never bring one on an in front call. I. Ah, never.

No, I don't even have SDRs do it anymore. Now, state your purpose, state what you want and then get it. It's what if? Really quite simple. What? What if? What if you're on the call? They asked to see like some sort of the product or anything like that. When you do it now, you're talking. That means you're asking the right questions. HMM, that's not walking somebody through a boring ass demo. Hmm Right, you've incited enough curiosity. Exactly, you're bringing curiosity to them, not the other way around. Right. So it's sure you're curious about their problem, if they're actually going to buy it or not. Writing. Everybody wants to get paid, but also the same time, like building, the intrigue means that they're talking more about their problem than you are your solution and and and if you're doing that, probably in the goal. How would you guys do that, right or can I see how you guys do that? I've heard that so many times it's not even funny and then you just boom. I sometimes have like three or four like really well thought out slides ready to go or a very specific part of the demo or product that I want to show them before I even get on the call. And odds are the questions that I asked to get to. That works every time. HMM, because it's real live examples, it's real live intrigue. It's great. Let's Talk Next Steps and then walking them through that timeline, that good old timeline sale. Who is it that ton of? That was Yaco. I was Yako winning by design. I think he's actually part of pavilion now. Yako, if you're listening to this year, the man that good old timeline management, you know, and if you have that interest enough, getting him to the end is just step by step, by step. You know I've done I've done a ton of enterprise sales. So for me it's a lot of it's, you know, eighteen months before contract at sign you know what was our longest? I think my longest still the date, was twenty months with Disney. Oh It's been a big deal, it was supposed to be, but it's the media world. So it was like two hundred and seventy six pages of MSA around like Coba compliancy and GDPR and security events, background checks. I'm pretty sure, pretty sure it was the old cavity search. Get them, get them deep and you know, I don't even know how we eventually got to the end. Like that's how much legal was involved. You know what I mean? Like, as a salesperson, I was just like wait, we did it. Finally close, we finally got there. But even, like, even if you're calling small to meanium sized businesses, SASS company, try to get somebody's credit card thrown the systems. They sign...

...up for something for a year. It's the same thing, you know. So why do you think that's so hot? Why do you think so few salespeople have, you know, empathy as part of the process? Like what? Why is that? Well, because a lot of people when they think sales, and it's not that they're not empathetic, right. I think a lot of people need to work on their empathy. Is General, just in general, but as a salesperson, I think I think a lot of people they get they get a sales job, they're trained in a very specific way, maybe even with like cold calling scripts and stuff like that right. So they feel very and armory. Remember this, even with the admiral back in the day. They're like to say these things, ask these questions, right, and it felt weird to me, right, like I'm just supposed to call this person. I expect them to give a shit about any of this. Yeah, you know, before before I actually dive into it, before I strow words at them. And I think a lot of sales people unfortunately get trained that way or they think like used car sales or they think like where you're trying to you're trying to sell what you care about to somebody that might not care about it. Right. But it's all that oldest like, you know, tell me this pin kind of deal. You know. It's like well, here, write my name down. Oh, you can't hear. Here's been there's a thousand ways you can do that. I've heard so many great ones and I think honestly, that is actually the really, really most basic warm of it. Right like that. Even sell me this pin as a very empathetic question to ask somebody. And so if you start talking about the pain and not why that person might need one, you're gone, you're done. In past test. Very true. You so I want to pivot for a little bit talk about consulting in advising. A lot of folks that are in Pavilion, I feel like, either have that as a side Gig, they're starting to debt dive full in, or maybe they are full time in the consulting world. How long you've been you've been doing that for like eight years. You said five years. By five years. Yeah, so with some full time sprinkled in there, but like the advising, mentoring, like you know, all that kind of stuff. Yet about for five years now. How did you get that started? In June, you know, I I I had a full time job go awry and and one that I was really really hoping was going to be a good one, and it had been like the third or fourth time that had happened right where where I bet everything on them being loyal and sometimes they aren't right. Like I'm a loyal person and if they're not, well then I'm you know, I'm not there anymore. And I got into it because I was like man, like, why do I, why don't you doing this to myself? Like I get hit up like five times a day from recruiters and stuff like that for companies looking for expertise. My Buddy Jose a boot town and Boulder, the...

...accelerator, was like he's like, Hey, man, you know a lot of these lotties companies coming out of our accelerator seed round. You know, they've written they desperately need sales help. Yeah, you know, can you? Can you come on and give them an hour a week where you go through their deck and how they should approach phone calls and all that kind of stuff, because you can to build an amazing product if you have no idea how to sell it, then you know, what are you gonna do? So that was really where I found it to be a lot of fun, right, because then I wasn't focusing on one thing. I get to take the the basic principles and ideologies that I had formed around myself and how I had been successful and brought them to others. And so that was real estate, tech, Cryptotech, you know, tons of different SASS companies, things I didn't things I didn't even know. We're problems, you know that that people have built solutions to, which was really cool and and a lot of fun. But in the last three years I've focused heavily on video. Video in all that's different aspects, whether that's how quickly it's sent over the Internet for ads or, you know, how do we get a hundred different very video variants of this Fab letics add to convert, right. So that's been a lot of fun because everybody, I think at this point, knows that if you're not using video in your in your advertising, your probably were not going to make it in some fashion. I mean, you know, the whole user generated content. You know, empathetic cell works really well. You know, like this is why I love it, this is why you should love it. Right. Yeah, has has done phenomenal so nice. So we're the one thing I will say. Yeah, the one thing I will say is it does have its ups and downs. Yeah, but it has its stems and flows. It is especially like, and I'll say this is the most important tactic for a salesperson getting paid, right. Yeah, that that that constant fight to make sure be clients pay in their in voices and commission stuff like that. Is is not easy. It's not easy at all, and so if it's something you're going to do, be prepared to not only sell yourself but also to help themselves. I've heard that from other people that get into the are deep in the advising game that it sounds a nuance or something that you would look over. But getting clients actually pay their invoices on time, we're at all being like a major headache. But what's a major headache for everybody? Yeah, you know, I've done enough accounts receivable at companies now where it's like, you know, I almost kind of feel like a mob and forcer sometimes, you know, like okay, Carl,...

...yeah, your's ninety days late, I know where you live, you know I pay your invoice. But as a consultant, you know it's you know, you don't want to lose the client, right. And and I when, if you're working at a company, it's like Hey, guys, be close, it's deal ninety days ago. You know, like they're going to turn it off if you guys all pay the pill, you know, and then send the two collections. So you should do that. But when it's for yourself, it's it's not as easy, right, it's a little little more nuance, a little more tricky to yeah, finesse that one a little bit. Yeah, it's not like, guys, it's twenty six missed the first by twenty six days again, anyway. But yeah, no, I mean it is fun if you want to learn more things, not only about yourself but also about industries, vertical solutions. You know, it's it's a lot of fun and there's I should have had it up, man, I forgot. And there's definitely some really good programs out there to get you into it before you actually dive into it, right, like. So I started advising and mentoring before I went full at full consultatude. Right. So a lot of the advising mentoring that I was doing actually turned into consultative clients. Right, they're like we like this guy, we're going to put them on retainer and and cut them commissions. The other thing I'll say is if you get on retainer, always get paid up front. If the you know, like, don't do the whole thirty days, you're not on everybody else's payroll. Just like an attorney, I don't do anything for you until I get paid, right. And and a lot of companies don't like that, but it doesn't matter, like you don't work for them. Yeah, that's the thing you have to remember, is you don't work for them, they work for you. Know you, you work for them. As far as like the retainer. That's it. Yeah, also much higher commission payouts as a consultant. Yeah, my average is thirty percent of all everywhere I drive. HMM, so you're actually set like going in and actually selling stuff too. Yea, what do you think this is? Well, I didn't know if you were going and just like show them decks, look this and so, you should do this. Now, I I I do the whole Shebang. I run the full desk. Right, if, well, especially, I mean all of our startups. Right, like, I've never come into a company that's got a hundred person team. Tried to tell him to be how to become a two hundred person team. Yeah, you're getting in right, like, yeah, like, here, we'll keep doing whatever got you to a hunter. Just do that again, only, yeah, better, good, hundred grand thinks by yeah. So, no, it's very early stage stuff and that's why I have the high, high retainer, High Commission pay out. It is like look, if I and driven rooting for you in...

...ninety days, yeah, I want my fair chunk of that. But she should, as you should, absolutely absolutely. Let me hit you games with a couple rapid fires before before I let you go. It's good so first up, big learners on this podcast, curious if you are a reader, if there's any books. They could be sales, really, they could be completely other genre, they could be fiction for all we care, but anything that that is a favorite of yours been impactful for you, anything that comes to mind. Ah. So, dude, it's a great question. I love that you asked because I one of my one of my covid goals was was read more and and I actually like bought books again, the actual ones, ones that have like pages in them. They spea nice and like yeah, yeah, it has words in it. And and really and really dove into ancient history, which was really cool. Man, especially especially like Graham Hancock. He does like finger prints of the gods. You know, early America, you know the things that are you know, history is not what we were told or what we were taught period. And if you believe that, then really just feel sorry if you go read a book. But that was that was really cool. Favorite prints of the gods, I highly remember for for anybody, and this is not like ancient aliens TV show kind of deal, like nerdy stuff. This is like he is a world renowned archeologist. He has been all over the world studying the coolest monuments on the planet for three decades. Dude knows this stuff right well. Also, at the same time as is an astrophysicist, and I mean he's a smart guy, right, like believe every word that comes out of his mouth. It's good. If plus, if you need to go to sleep, it's even better then. Also, I got an audible kick to so green lights by Matthew mcconaughey. That's plastic. It's so good, right, and you can't read that. You can't read that book. You know, like you have to have him tell it to you. Yeah, exactly, exactly. You know, it's his story. You know, that's to mention that. You know, it's just the greatest voice ever when it comes to like you know, he'll rat, oh, rat, oh rat. He talks about that in the book too, by the way, where that all came from. And another really good one, just around life, family and in your existence on this planet, is twelve rules of life, or twelve rules for life, by Jordan Peterson. HMM, have you read it? I have. Yeah, right, it's good. God, do what is meaningful, not what is expedient, right, yeah, just, yeah, treat yourself as something says, somebody you're responsible for helping, you know, but like just just...

...an amazing psychologist and cows. And what was the other one that I read that was really good? American DESPERADO. HMM. That is the story of John Roberts, or John Ricabono, the mob enforcer turn cocaine cowboy. It it's enlightening. You know, we think of ourselves as all as good people, right, as most of the population is, but you know, we end and I think that's why we find the evil side of things so intriguing. Is He is? He was. He died in two thousand and eleven or fourteen. He was literally the true definition of evil, right, and he there's this there's a section of the book because it's his tell all before he died where he was like, you know, some everybody thinks everything has to be good. I was the evil and I was good at it and it was like, you know, it just gives you the chills, you know, Lady Dude literally spent seventy years like being an evil person. Yeah, you know, and you could tell you regretted it, but it was all he knew, all he knew. HMM. And guess you're taught to to him. The US government crazy. He was an army ranger. That's how he became a mob andforcer today, and then moved eighty billion dollars worth of cocaine through Miami and saying yeah, crazy. Book. I like the the nonfiction better than the fiction. I don't know. Fiction for me has kind of lost its way. Yeah, those are all great. All Great. Raccos. Couple I know. Couple I don't that. I'll need to check out. Our next question. What's going on in the in the James Cavalier headphones, music wise, spotify, apple, music, whatever. Like. What do you what are you listening to nowadays? Man, you know it's interesting you bring that up. I have loved music since I was little. I can play the pig, can't the piano, the Guitar, Alto, Sax, cround, supers x went tenor sex phone. I have Djed. I have, you know, Made Beats, my beats laboratory, but definitely one of those things that I did. I I hate to say it, I like it all. You know, I used to like I've gotten back into like s heir metal, you know, and it actually quite recently and there's obviously a lot of like new good stuff like kissing dynamite and Steel Panther and stuff like that. If you don't know who they are, highly suggest you go check them out. But I was watching that new show with John Cena, peacemaker on Hbo Max, and they have all of these awesome like old like hair metal bands, like the choirboys, kissing dynamite, some...

...of the others I can't remember off the top of my head, but it really just like immediately just I was like right back to my like rock playlist. You know, got out of my hiphop country and like Edim playlist and just went straight back, because I have one that's just entirely dedicated to nothing but metal. Yeah, mostly for working out, but also to like I listen to that at the golf range. Yeah, it dial seven irons. Yeah, by the way, I went from like hundred's golf to, I shaw seventy five last week. Wow, I like I like Florida, I like fo Dang, you got to be committed to do that. Well, I joined the TPC Perstansia here in Sara Sona as a young professional for five hundred dollars. Wow. Yeah, it's normally like sixty five tho. That's drain the TPC network, but their entire membership is dying. I'd say that way, but it was. And so they're like, look, we have developer credits that are expiring. Like please, just a little post her furst deal for you. So, so it's thirty six holes and some of the nicest golf you could pop. I mean think TPC stack grass, but private. Yeah, and and two of them. And Yeah, some just really nice facilities, and my golf game has has exponentiated. It's great. That's why that's wild. All Right, last question for you, James. Who in your network or that you're friends with would you like to see come on the pavilion podcast next? Well, that's a good question. That's a good question, you know. Okay, so, if you want to go more marketing focused or growth focus, you absolutely talk to my Buddy Nick Sharma, DDC, brand guru, the man, the myth, the legend, you know. He has just growth marketing is literally in his bones, like sales is in mine. You know, if you want to go sales, let's see, let me pull my linkedin. Who am I talk to you recently that I would actually enjoy this. Justin fibbitch from singular. He's a great guy, very hot, from thesis. I'm not really sales but just really smart marketer, which is now part of Barrington media ares where James Go. I can't remember his last name. I can't remember his last name because we have the same first name. That's why I can't remember it. Hang on one second, him, it's here, were and whatever. Those are good. Those three are great, cool, perfect. You caught me in a...

...lock A. I started out eighteen holes and then worked all day and then now I'm tired. So, yeah, it's been a long day. James, first of all, appreciate you coming on, sharing your stories, sharing your opinions with everyone. If folks one who get in touch with you, if they have questions, they want to connect, they want to hire you, they want to disagree with you, whatever it is. What's the best place to hit you up? Hit Me with nothing but the disagreement. I like the challenge. Bring the debate. Yeah, of course, I'm always open opportunity. If you want to get a hold of me and connect, the best way I do that through Linkedin. I would give out my cell phone number, but, but, but, I I if I start getting death threats from from my opinions then that I might just have to like, you know, Scrorel away somewhere. But now my linked it's got all my contact and fall on there if you want to get ahold of me, and it's best way to do awesome, Cool James. Appreciate you coming on. Thanks, Tim. All Right, thanks for listening. That episode was brought to you by Sindoso. They are redefining the way businesses inspire human connections by offering an intelligent gifting experience with a global fulfillment infrastructure, highly curated premium vendors, deep analytics and personalization at scale. Thanks for listening. Check me out on Linkedin. My Name's Tom lemo. Until next week, let's keep getting after it. Thank God it's Monday. Peace. She so.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (253)