The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 4 months ago

Ep 244: Lessons From A First-Time CRO w/ Tyler Barron, CRO Encapture

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Lessons From A First-Time CRO w/ Tyler Barron, CRO Encapture 

Part of the TGIM (Thank God It's Monday!) series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

This episode was brought to you by Clary. Drip, drip, drip. That's the sound of revenue leaking from Your Business and it's your CEO is where it's worst night there why? In tough economic times, every drop of revenue counts. Revenue leak represents money you've earned that is somehow slipping through the cracks. Luckily, our friends and Clary have a purpose built revenue platform designed to help you stop revenue leak and drive revenue precision through the framework of Revenue Collaboration and governance. To learn more, visit CLARY DOT com. Slash thrive. All right, everybody, welcome back to the pavilion podcast. We learned the tips, tricks and tactics you need to be successful in your revenue role. I Got Tyler Bearon C R O of and capture with me on the pod today coming out of Dallas Texas. Tyler, how we doing? Man, doing great. Appreciate you have me on Tom Likewise, man, I'm excited to h to be chatting with you and it's been a it's been a few years, probably a year and a half or two years more or less, since you and I connected Um when you were pretty early in the days of capture. So I'm excited to hear about every how everything's been going and, uh, and catch up on it all. Yeah, absolutely, it's good catching up there earlier and uh, you appreciate you having me on. So let's let's let's dive on in man Um. I want to spend the bulk of today's time talking about you your first C r o roll. There's a lot of folks that are members of pavilion that listen to this pod that either they're in their first C r o role, maybe they failed at their first one Um, or aspire to become a C R O, and so I want to spend a lot of time there. Before we do that, let's let's take it one step prior to you getting the C R o roll right, your vp of sales and Um. Just based on my Linkedin, you know, kind of research, what I saw like you had a little bit of a gap period for six or so months from vp of sales before you started and capture where you're doing some consulting. Um. Could you walk me through like that time period was there? was there a period where you were considering doing the consulting full time? was that more of just like, Hey, I want to wait for the right opportunity to come across my desk or what was that time period kind of all about for you? Yeah, I mean that was kind of just like a little bit of a reset period for me, and it was a little bit of of all the above. You know, I had a I had a great run as as a VP of sales at my last company. Um, was fortunate to where it was one of those deals to where I joined really early. Um, I was just an individual contributor as a salesperson. Did extremely well for the first couple of years. Said Hey, look, I want to be VPS sales and started building the team out underneath me and had a pretty good run doing that for, you know, a little over five years and you know, just like you know all things that that just are never perfect, we just kind of eventually broke up and, you know, one of the things that I really wanted in my career was that I wanted the CR overall because, you know, nothing, nothing necessarily, you know, terribly wrong with my my old company just I just felt like across the board, just the model was broken, and so I really wanted to find somewhere that that was willing to, you know, give me the opportunity to do that. Um, part of that transition was, you know, I started my own company Doing Fractional C r o work and you know, it's I'm down here in Dallas and you know, Dallas isn't known. Is this great, you know early Growth Tech Cup. and I'm not throwing shade here at Dallas or anything, but what you get in Dallas a lot of is is a lot of really really early so, you know, working with the product founder that hasn't quite found product market fit yet, and then you've got a lot of, you know, late stage tech companies that that relocate like massive hubs here and you know we're you know, we're down in Austin. You've got a ton of you know, series a, series b like kind of really that hyper growth phase.

Dallas is a little bit different. Now it's getting better, but you know, two years two and a half years ago, whenever this was going on, you know that that was especially the case. And so, you know, as I got, you know, closer with the tech community, started working with a lot of tech founders, you know, around just you know, building out you know product market fit, kind of their go to market motions and doing fractional C r o work and I really enjoyed it. But also it was a way for me to more or less date people to see if that was kind of the journey I wanted to go down. Um, I also tried to build my own product for a while to Um, you know, I'm really into the outdoors and uh, I kind of like had this concept to where I was gonna work for or I was gonna build like an airbnb concept, you know, connecting uh, connecting folks there and uh in like actually in the big game hunting space and, you know, had the opportunity to to learn how to build a product and, you know, but moren't anything. I didn't know what I was gonna do and also I was tired. I just needed a break. I got young kids, Um, I got a three year old and a six year old, and I just wanted to spend more time with them and just candidly, I didn't want to boss for a while. Um, and uh, I you know, I felt the consulting was a great opportunity to really accomplish all those things. Right it uh, it allowed me to to get close to the tech community and kind of date folks and figure out if it was something, whether or not they were really ready to bring on, you know, a you know go to market leader like myself, Um, and then also just look for great opportunities and then kind of work on, you know, the monetization of a hobby that I had, um, as well. And so it was it was a good period, Um, you know. And Uh, and it was kind of interesting. I I met will our CEO here to capture Um, literally a week before I was about to take another job offer which the company was going to be up in New York. And and I was I was a little bit nervous about it. Um. This was actually pre covid and was kind of worried I was gonna have to travel a whole lot. That was one of the reasons why I burned out. I was guilty about missing time with my kids and Um, I remember meeting will and and saying hey, like this is the great opportunity for me to stay here in Dallas. We keep our roots planned here with our family and uh, you know, just like everything else, like it just always kind of works. It works itself out, don't you know? Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Did you, Um, did you feel like the fractional work, Um, helped you in trying to to find, you know, to get yourself to the next step and in part of that process, or what was the process like just in general, of like, you know, trying to take that next step from vp to to the c suite and, you know, convincing folks to, you know, more or less take a shot on you as the first time C R? Oh yeah, I mean doing the fractional work and just working for myself and building my own business, even as small as it was, definitely helped me develop a lot of empathy, Um, one just for for CEOS that I work with, just around how hard it is. Um. Also, even though it was just more of a hobby that I was building, like developing a product, helped me developed like a lot more empathy for, you know, for c t o s that I had worked with and kind of like figuring those things out, you know. And then also it exposed me a lot to just some earlier stage stuff to where, you know, whenever I joined my last company, you know, we were funded, we had a business. Um, it wasn't like I was stepping in from scratch and you know, working with uh, you know, as as a fractional CR a lot of times was like they're like hey, look, you know, I've got to go figure out a way how to actually, you know, go get funding and bring this to market. And it was really, really ground for it. A lot of times it was just a lot of helping them validate the idea with the market, you know, put together you know different you know industry groups form to say hey, look, you know, let's go bounce this off of, you know, a couple of, you know, leaders within this space that you're trying to...

...l into it just validate those ideas. So so, yeah, I mean it definitely, Um, gave me a give me a more deal respect for just how hard that that period is of finding product market fit, Um. And you know, it also kind of created some some firm convictions for me to where I was like, all right, you know, what do I really want to look for in a C R O role? And one of my requirements was like hey, they need to actually be ready for a C R oh. You know, it's that's somebody that's here to figure out how to how to sell your product. It's how do you actually scale that and and kind of, you know, tin x, whatever you're already doing, not like hey, what is the market think about this idea you have? Um, yeah, yeah, absolutely Um. So you you land the role Um and you start more or less, I think, April. So really like the beginning days of of covid Um. So not only is the first time C R oh, but first time C R O walking into covid Um. Walked me through the first like a couple of weeks, a couple of months there of that learning experience. Yeah, so it's even a little bit shakier than that going into it. So I had met our CEO and in January we dated for a couple of months and ultimately, like by the end of February, we had agreed that, hey, you know, I'm gonna come on board as a C R oh. And I was like Hey, look, I got one more consulting engagement I need to wrap up and then I want to take a little bit of a break in March and let's do April first start. And we said okay, perfect. I remember him calling me. I think it was like, you know, right around like you know, March fifteenth or something like whenever the stock market bomb that day, and he's like he's like hey, man, like, you know, I think I think we need to kind of maybe rethink the timing of this and all this. And you know, I was pretty nervous and uh and I remember just sitting there with my wife thinking about it for a little bit and praying on it. And, you know, finally I went back to you know, called them back and I was like hey, look, man, you know you're actually probably gonna need me more than ever. You've got some big decisions to make. Um, let me come in and help you make an assessment of everything that's going on. Um. And you know, at the end of the day, you know I can help you figure this stuff out. and Uh and it was hard, you know, just coming into a new company. Um, you know, nobody knows what's going on with with the world. You know, it wasn't a company that that was fully remote. You know, we had some people that remote, that were remote, but you know, I had to develop a relationship with everybody remote, which a lot of people have learned to do that, but you know, then it was it was a little bit different and uh, I remember a couple of weeks into it, Um, you know, our CEO and I just had so much that we just needed to hash through that. Like finally, him and I were like hey, look, like nobody is at the office, like, I don't care if we've got to stand a hundred feet apart with mask on, like we just need to kind of get in the room and white board some stuff and just smashed through it. So it was it was definitely an interesting experience. Um, you know, I'm I'm actually I'm I'm glad that it worked out the way it did, because it really made us come in and examine the decisions that we were making just a lot deeper. Um, and and sometimes it's smarter, you know, because you you walk in as a C R O or, you know, as a VP of sales and you're like all right, how much budget do we need? Let's roll here's here's the changes we're gonna make. Let's just go, go, go, go, go. And it it allowed us to really proceed with a lot more caution and just make some smarter business decisions. And, you know, I think, I think that was something that, you know, it was one of my big weaknesses in the past was that I could make decisions. You know, I could kind of leap without looking a lot of times and, uh, you know, it just forced us to be a lot more cautious and smart, Um, with the with the company's capital and the business decisions that we're making. Yeah, and and being, you know, maybe more are we're talking a little bit about this before the...

...pod, but maybe being a little bit more conservative and and patient in the early days. Um. You know, in one maybe that that felt like, man, are we are we not pushing it hard enough? But now, when we look at July two, when we're recording this and there's a lot of stuff going on in the world and in the country financially, Um, that, you know, it feels like, you know, maybe that was the right decision, Um, so that you know you have more of a secure foundation to be working off of. Yeah, no, absolutely. Look, I'll give I'll give the majority of our credit to our CEO, will, like Um. I think one thing that has been pretty interesting is that you always learned so much from the CEO as you work for, and this was my first time working for really a true business CEO and you know, not a product CEO or, you know, a heavy engineering CEO, and you know they've they've all got through advantages. But one thing about will is, you know, he's got a very strong financial background and the vision that he laid out in terms of just from even as early as we were was all about capital efficiency and good unit economics and just building a good, sustainable business and saying, look like, we we don't have to be like everybody to where we just raise money and spend it as quickly as possible. You know, let's let's figure those things out early, because most people say, Hey, we'll do that, then we'll figure that out. Um and and we made those decisions earlier and and from time to time it was hard, you know, because you know, look just like anybody else. You look at your your capacity playing, you know, tops up from quota cover or bottom down from UOTA coverage and tops up from the demand side of things. You're like hey, man, like this is not a lot of room for for for error. I mean we've got to have really high hit rate and you know there's a tendency to want to pad that more. But at the same time it also really makes you tighten up and slow down and say, Hey, look like, we don't have to have these huge teams if we're really great at executing and we really focus on great process and we really focus on putting together really smart deal structures and and just having some financial discipline and maybe maybe just waiting on, on on on some decisions every once and now and then. Um, but you know, I hidesight, like you know, I think from time to time like that was a little, a little frustrating. I mean, we had a competitor to go out and raise like a massive, you know, a hundred million dollar series B, and we're like, Oh man, and we knew we could do the exact same thing. Um and uh, you know, and now I'm I'm kind of glad we did, because we've got great board dynamics as is. We've got a really smart, sustainable business. We haven't had to lay people off. In fact, we've actually been able to grow throughout this kind of spookiness that's going on in the market right now. Um and UH and, and you know, it's it's it's really just because, you know, we we thought about how do we build a smart, sustainable business from from day one and uh, you know, I don't know what point or time, and I'm not gonna, you know, my soapbox too hard here, but I don't know at what point of time that like you know, the whole world of tech decided just completely veer away from like sound financial principles. Um. But you know, and I'm not saying that we got it all figured out, trust me, we've got our struggles just like everybody else. But I mean that the whole tech market in general just got too crazy. You know, it was just like the capital Faucet was was never gonna get turned off. And and you know now some folks that I think it's kind of showing that they got caught, you know, how pretty flat footed on this. Yeah, yeah, I mean there's there's definitely something to be said about, Um, you know, veering the opposite path of what what everyone else is doing, especially when it looks, you know, too good to be true. You know, oftentimes it catches up with with folks at some point. Um, I'm curious just on that topic. Um, you know, maybe just continue to compare and contrast, like you got, getting into a company that's...

Um, you know, on the private equity side, versus, you know, an early stage growth company that's, you know, backed by venture capitalists and and getting those eight figure, nine figure funding rounds like, you know, for folks that maybe have only lived in one world or the other. Um, maybe you can compare and contrast a little bit about like what the strategy is and and what that day to day looks like and why, I guess you're confident with with the approach that that you all have taken so far. Yeah, no, I don't mind sharing that at all. And and look, my perspective is is from the from the view of how a go to market leader would do it right and, Um, you know, I I'll kind of talk. I'll tell you what my assumptions were coming in, Um, and where I was wrong. So, you know, one thing that I kind of looked at was, you know, thinking that hey, because there's an existing business in place, there's an existing client base, Um, and there's just needs to be a pivot of of how the company wants to go to market and rebrand and do some things like that. Um that that it's kind of was like it was gonna be easier and that was like a faster path than than going through the you know, kind of the hell years at an early startup to where you're like really trying to kind of figure out product market fit for the first couple of years and then you know, you sell your first ten deals and then you throw gasoline on the fire. And I mean candidly, it's actually been more because I've I've done both now and candidly, I feel like, Um, the the pure startup thing was actually easier. Um. And you know it's really because you're you're you're smaller group. Everybody is just completely bought in. Um. It's kind of like the good old days feeling to where you're just doing whatever it takes and everybody's just really kind of just feeding off that energy all the time. And then, you know, on the private equity side of things, you know you're brought in. Um. Usually there's a change of executive leadership and you've you've really got to deal with with a pretty big change management element on the people's side of things and you know, getting people to you know, Building Trust with folks and you can't just lay out, lay out this big strategy and expect people to just buy in instantly. It's going in and individually, building trust with key players. Um, sometimes making hard decisions whether or not the right folks are you know that we're previously they are going to be the folks that you need to put on the field moving forward. Um. You know, there's art decisions that have to be made. But Um, yeah, I think my experience is that it's actually been a lot more challenging. Um. That being said, like from a you know, board perspective, you know, and and just you know, my participation in it, you know, just as the C R oh is is. You know, our equity partners are fantastic. Um, you know, their their patient, they're strategic, they're they're great guys to work with. Um, you know, and uh, I've feel like the relationship has been extremely collaborative there. But, you know, comparing contrasting this to the pure startup, I thought that this would kind of be like a like a short cut, and what I found was that and if you think about like all the things that that you do as a as a you know, marketing leader, sales leader or whatever it might be, you know, it's like you you've got all these execution goals, but at the end of the day it's all about people, right and Um, you know, a lot of times as a startup it's just like hey, you you just start adding people from your network. Most of the time they already love you and they're already bought into what you're doing and, you know, on the piece side of the p Turner, outside of things, it's like hey, you kind of inherit a team. You've got to win them over, you've gotta Build Trust, you've got to really show them that you care candidly. You've got to show them that you can deliver to Um and and that that, hey, you're somebody that you're not just, you know, all big talk that you could actually execute and really help them and really help them with their goals. And then you you know, you...

...you start to grow and you get to bring some folks in from your network and do that. But you know, just that that whole elements it's been different. Um, I will say that I have been very pleasantly just surprised in terms of how much I've appreciated the fiscal responsibility Um that that I've had to really adjust to, just in terms of Um. You know, working for a private equity back company and and thinking about things like around, you know, capital efficiency, gross margin targets, Um, you know, really trying to keep our sales and marketing costs Um, you know, when line, you know, at a reasonable ratio to our are our growth Um. Just just there's just been a lot more accountability that's been pushed out on me, Um, incapably. Like at the beginning, I think it was something I was, you know, pretty, pretty uncomfortable with and, Um, you know, kind of had this this very start up the attitude where I'm like, dude, it doesn't matter right now, like whatever it takes to win the logos, Um. And Uh, you know, now I'm, you know, a couple of years into this and I'm like man, I'm really glad that we slowed down. We said notice some things, we said notice some bad deals, we waited on certain things and we made some smarter business decisions. Um. So yeah, I mean it's it's got it's plus and minuses, Um, and it's it's a there's been a lot that I've learned here over the past couple of years. Been Good. Well, I think there's there's a tendency to kind of uh, you know, talk about the sexy hot startup that's got the nine figure funding, you know, series b round and Um, and it kind of glamorized everything that's going on there, Um and overlook you know, a strategy of just going you know, sticking to the fundamentals and turning down bad deals that are gonna be headaches, you know, three months from now or put you in a bad spot in terms of the financials. And so I love hearing the other side of it because I just don't think that, you know, it gets as as much, maybe notorize or as or as much talk on some of these types of podcasts. Um, I'd love to hear just from a first time C R oh, you know, you're two years in. First of all, you've uh, you've surpassed the average tenure of the C R O, which I think is about seventeen or eighteen months. So congrats on that, AP appreciate it. I get the survivor ribbon, you know. So, so, two years in, I'm curious, like if you were to read, if you were to restart from day one, like what would you have changed? What's something that you would have, you know, told your two year old two year ago self, anything like that, you know, big mistakes that you feel like you made that you wouldn't want to replicate. Yeah, no, I mean Tom that's a that's a really good question. I mean, I'll be really just, you know, candid about some things. I had some very hot opinions, UM, coming into this role, like just about why, why this, why I needed to be c r o somewhere and how certain things to be run differently than just absolutely humbled me, Um, like Katidly, like I always had very hot opinions about how marketing should be run and, you know, felt like there was some money wasted there. And you know, I spent my first year just doing so much brain damage trying to figure out marketing and it was it was way more challenging than I expect. Is terribly difficult to measure. You know, as a as a sales leader, I was used to measuring like, you know, hey, we do this and it results in this and if it works, we do more of it and and some of the things on the marketing side are just a lot more clugy than that. Um. So, you know, I definitely felt like I was humbled there. Um, you know. So I think that, you know, if I could kind of do a reset on some things, Um, I probably would have gone deeper in some of the areas that that we eventually got to. Um. So our our solution, and not to get into anything technical here, but you know, we're machine learning platform that is an operational efficiency tool and Tom in theory it can automate...

...anything that's that's document intensive, whether those are digital doctor paper docks doesn't matter. And so whenever I first got here, we had healthcare clients, we had government clients, we have banking clients, but our best logos were in banking and so we said, hey, let's really focus on banks. And now that I'm in this two years, it's like, man, it's not just banks. It's like what is the slice of that within banking, like as a banking compliance? Is it auto lending? And the deeper and deeper we get into the slices, the better we understand the business problems, the more value we can actually deliver to the clients, the better deals that we can do, the more we can differentiate. And if I would have really really just kind of narrowed our focus just even tighter, I think we could have went way faster. I mean we we still have triple revenues that I've been here, but there was a lot of things that, like some shiny things outside of the sphere of success that we're having right now in terms of other market sectors, that we chased and didn't have success, that we wasted tons of time and money on that. We could have said no to and then we just would have got got like a lot more deeper into the slices of the market. Um, you know, it's like you look at a whole vertical like, you know, the financial services sector. You know, there's a thousand slices of that and you know, I really think that that that we should you know, you know, we're still getting there, but I think we should have just like been super narrow earlier, and we eventually got there, but even now we're really trying to kind of subdivide that and I think that would have made us go a lot faster, Um, you know. So that's that's probably the biggest one. I think also too, and and this is always relevant, Um, you know, just really going in and just listening to the existing client base and just developing those relationships a lot tighter. Uh. You know, whenever you come in, you put together a plan. The first thing that you want to do outside of open the pipeline, because you know, if you don't have really great demand, it doesn't matter, is you try to bring in really great closers, right, because you want to execute and you know, it's it's it's counterintuitive, but I wish that we probably would have made a bigger investment bringing in a players on the account management, like really good strategic account management. Um, you know. We we've done a fantastic job on the C s side, but like really, you know, dedicating, you know, a person to just managing maybe two or three huge accounts and really really got close to those and realized that, hey, you know, in the world of enterprise, if you've already got these really great logos, they want dedicated resources. We could have listened a lot better. We could have understood these problems better. We you know, second order revenues always more capital efficient, lower tax, shorter sales cycles. So I think I would have doubled down on that, and we did some of that, but I would have narrowed the scope of their response ability and got them to go deeper within just a handful of like really key logos, and I would have beefed up the talent level that that we brought into Um you know. But yeah, I mean I don't think, uh, you know, anything drastically different. Um, you know. Definitely would have would have needed to kind of shift my mentality a little bit as well. Um, you know, and just realized that, whether you're doing a working for a startup, you know, anything that that is in the growth phase, you know, series a B C, you know, or seed round, whatever it might be, or that you know working for a PEA company, it's gonna be really freaking hard. And coming in at an executive level, people are hiring you to solve problems and and and fix things and and execute and you know, I I felt like I was gonna be able to do it extremely fast and I've been very happy with the results we've driven. But at the same time, like, you know, just,...

Hey, man, just just be patient, keep playing the long game, really kind of think about like just the long term value that that you can provide Um, you know, just I think I kind of came in with an expectation of like hey, a couple of months I could have some huge wins under my belt and uh, you know, I think, you know, you know, maybe probably just did a little bit too much brain damage, being a hard on myself. You know what I mean? I think I think we've all I think we've all been there. But I hear the general theme of like, you know, trying to niche down and trying to really focus and specialized, whether it's, you know, where you're targeting customers, what people's roles are and their responsibilities and and really focusing on that, which I think is fantastic advice. Yeah, I mean, if we've we've done some things really right here that I'm proud of too, that I think I would even double down on more. Like we've developed a really great coaching culture here and you know, pretty much all my a s right now, all bdrs that have been promoted up in a two year window, and I mean they've they've done a fantastic job and, you know, I really think that if we did this this year, we you know, we're eighty people right now and we brought on somebody full time for sales enablement already. And it's like, you know, everybody kind of talks about, you know, REV OPS and sales off super early, but like, I mean, ultimately, how fast you get people to ramp, how fast you get people effective in the role? You know, there's probably a pretty strong argument for doing sales enablement streamulator early too. You know. Yeah, yeah, I think that's underutilized. Um, early on, uh Tyler, I think this has been, uh, really helpful advice. It's great to get behind the curtain with you. I'd love to spend a couple of minutes hitting you with a couple of rapid fires, let the audience know a little bit more about you personally. Sure. Yeah, all right. So, first up, we're big learners on this podcast. I'm not sure if you're a reader or how much for a reader you are, but if so, I'd love to hear any books, uh, that stand out, that that have been impactful throughout your career or your life, or even anything you picked up recently. Yeah, I mean I've always been, you know, just a big just a big reader period. Um. But from a sales standpoint, you know, qualified sales leader is probably one of the best sales book that's come out in the past five years. Um, you know, I I kind of grew up through the sales ranks of reading predictable revenue and and all that stuff and you know, applying that and you know, all that's been fantastic. I love listening to everything the pavilion has to offer and they've been fantastic in terms of just, you know, supporting my career growth and you know, I had the opportunity to help found the Dallas chapter there. But I've actually been on a pretty big kick here lately, and I'll give some credit to our our head of people, to where, you know, I've moved away from these real tactical salespace books and a lot of it is just around like, you know, more on the people's side of stuff. We had a an you probably heard of a lot of these, but we had a uh, you know, a big push here of of the book no ego Um, which really caught on huge at our company. That has just like been a fantastic book just in terms of really changing your mentality and making positive assumptions about people and and just really developing really sound team dynamics and great relationships, and I think that's something that you know, this past year and I've really focused a lot on Um. You know, I've had great sales coaches in the past. You know, you and I talked about this earlier. Guys like Scott Lee's was, you know, whenever I was first time vp of sales, he was a mentor to me, and this year I actually got a you know, got another executive coach, but it was all focused around, you know, Eq just emotional awareness, team dynamics and just really just at the end of the day, if you can't be a really great people leader and if you really can't build great teams, none of this other stuff matters. And so super long winded answer to to what am I reading?...

Uh, I think it's all great. Um, I'm curious. I'm not sure if you tune into podcasts, if you read newsletters or blogs or follow different people on Linkedin, but anything like that that you've been you've been digging into recently that's the top of mind for you or been helpful. Yeah, I mean, uh, you know, definitely, definitely follow all that stuff there. Um, you know, I don't know if there's any like any blogs or anything from a sales standpoint. Um, yeah, I mean outside of just you know. Yeah, I don't know. Tom You know, let's stick to Scott lease for now. Yeah, we could cut that out later. Yeah, Um, all right. WHAT GOES ON AFTER? Go ahead now, I said I didn't have a good answer for you. It's all good. It's sound good. Um, what goes on in the headphones? Music Wise for Italily? Man, I hate to say this, but I am turning into the biggest like old funny dud as it relates to music. Um, you know, so I will listen. I really like going back and like kind of like doing tours of of different like you know albums to where like you know, go back and like, you know, listen to like some old country from like the sixties or seventies, and like I've kind of kind of been like going through different, you know, different stuff like that. But Man, I'm I'm huge on audibles. Um, so, you know, just grant, probably listened to it thirty different books this past year. Um, you know, I don't know, man, I'm not. I'm not big on like having having jam sessions pumping through the headphones and Um, you know, I'm I'm kind of you know, I'm I'm thirty six and I'm finally like to the point where like I just kind of lot what quiet in my life. Uh. Yeah, so, you know, Um, what's what's something you'd like to do outside of work to recharge? Yeah, man, so this is kind of a weird thing about me. Like I've learned that I've actually got some pretty strong, like introvert qualities about myself. And you knows, as much as I love being around people and team and customers and and have, you know, really needed to have a good personality to be successful in my career. That somebody asked me that a similar question before. They're like, well, what do you do to recharge? I'm like, well, everything I do to recharge is all really things that I do by myself. So, you know, I live on a little small farm about an hour north of Dallas. We've got seven acres. That's kind of Hilarious, but I've got too many donkeys and too many cows. What do you mean? What does a mini donkey and a mini cow like? A baby dude, they're they're hilarious looking and they're awesome. Imagine like what a what a regular coward donkey looks like, but they're only like three feet tall. They're awesome. The kids love them. So, you know, I really like you know, it looks like I'm I'm such a faker. Like you know, I'm moving down her Texas and, like you know, every any real Texas ranchers hobby. He's calling me the biggest fraud ever. But you know, I like messing around doing stuff like that and taking care of them and, Um, you know, and teaching my kids how to take care of them. That's fun. Uh, I love the outdoors. Um, I love to fish, I love to hunt. I've I've really gotten pretty deep into archery over the past by six years and I've gone on some really fantastic adventures with my bow all across the world. UH, five years, and it's it's been, it's been a really great passion of mine and it it's been a lot of fun. And you know, it's and it's less about the hunting and more just about the adventure and the isolation and the challenge of it. Um and uh, I I enjoy doing are things and Um, you know. But it's funny. You know...

...it's a you know, and you know Tom Youran sells. You know how it is. Just our our brains are constantly racing just all the time and it's wonderful whenever you have these things that just force you to disconnect and just completely do a hard reset on your brain. And it's funny, after being out the wilderness for two or three days, how you're you're just how just more aware, and you know you are, and all of a sudden you just everything seems brighter and the sounds are louder and and it's just like all your senses just wake up and it's it's funny how dull we get just because we're constantly dealing with so much clutter in our lives all the time. You know, it's it's really interesting. I was gonna say nothing that probably stills the mind more than learning archery. Um, I feel like it's just such a a sport of intense focus and, Um, you know you're not you're not listening to to music or to a to an audio, but you like you gotta stayed incredibly focused, just like on the you know, on the target and on the bow and in the Arrow and you know the whole process of it. Yeah, I mean it's Super Cathartic. I mean like just just shooting the bow spun just in relaxing, because you know you've got so much going through your mind. But if you know, there is something very zen like to just sitting there staring, staring at a dot and trying to have intense focus about it. You know. Yeah, yeah, that's really cool. Um. Alright. My last one for you, Tyler, is who is someone that you'd like to see come on this podcast next? Oh, that's a great question. Um, let me think about that one a little bit Tom Um. Alright, alright, let's give you a better answer. Have you had? Have Y'all had John McMahon? I'm sure you'll have. I don't think we have. I don't think we have, but I did read his book, which is outstanding. He's a tough man to get ahold of. So yeah, I kind of feel like that's kind of too big of a name to Um. Yeah, let me let me think about some folks that that I know that are just doing some really interesting stuff right now. Um, have you had leathan hats if hat Scott on my own podcast? I've not had him on this one, so it could be this could be a good form for it. Yeah, Um, yeah, let me think about that a little bit more. Um, those are two big names though. Right there. Let's shoot high. Let's shoot high. Let's go for John McMahon. I'll start cold prospecting him. I'll see, see you on it and we'll we'll tag team. Well, you're probably not gonna have much luck there with the C C. I don't know if. I don't know if that's gonna get us about the power line there. Um, Tyler, I appreciate you coming on being super generous with your time before I let you go. One Who let you kind of take the stage and, uh, you know, share where people can connect with you. I know y'all are are hiring quite a bit. You're you're growing Um, which is unique given what's going on right now in the world, and it's a great place to be. So Um once. Let you kind of talk about that for a minute too. Yeah, no, I appreciate that time. We have been fortunate to be able to to grow throughout kind of a, you know, weird economy that we're in and look, we're looking for for top enterprise, go to market talent and uh, I would love to connect with anybody and just in general. I think one thing I've learned in my career is that, and Thomas, kind of how you and I met, is just having relationships with folks and figuring out when and where you can help people. I'd be glad to help out give any advice any time I can, because you never know whenever you're gonna need it and it's kind of like you gotta make that deposit just into the you know, into the bank, because you never know whenever. You know, you just need a little bit of good will to come your way too. So be glad to connect with anybody, whether it's about opportunities here and to capture Um, or just want to connect to talk shop or General Advice, or anyway. I would be helpful. Awesome, man Todd, for AH coming on man. You appreciate it,...

Tom Thank you. This episode was brought to you by Clary, the only enterprise system that's purpose built to run revenue. CLARY's revenue platform helps identify and stop Revenue League so you can achieve revenue precision predictably and repeatedly. To learn more, visit CLARY C L A R I dot Com.

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