The Pavilion Podcast
The Pavilion Podcast

Episode · 11 months ago

Ep 100: 100 Episodes of Revenue Collective!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Episode 100 of The Revenue Collective - Like you've never heard it before.

Tom Alaimo and Brandon Barton double team this episode with Sam Jacobs and a veritable parade of guests - PLUS a HUGE announcement about the future of Revenue Collective both as a community and this show!

Hello everyone and welcome to the Revenue Collective. A. K. A New Name Pavilion podcast. We have a lot to talk about today. This is a very special episode. This is episode 100. We'll be getting into some really amazing content. But let's start with, Who's here? I am your host, Brandon Barton and we also have your co host Tom Alamo. First time that Tom and I, since we've taken over the podcast, I hope you've been listening to both of us first time that Tom and I are doing a little co hosting on the pod together and as Tommy would say, got to bring out the big guns if we're going to do episode 100. So nothing better than having the Godfather himself here. Sam, Jacobs Sam, How are you? I'm well, I'm, well, I'm honored to be among such august company. I appreciate you lying for us. Well, was mainly talking about Tommy. Okay, okay, that would make more sense for the host of the Millennial sales podcast. I'm honored to be in his presence. What are you now? Are you a boomer sam or are you, uh, I'm a gen xer. I think I'm solidly gen x. Here we are. Episode 100. Today is an incredibly important day. I hope most of you that are listening to this have heard already about some of the changes that are going on at the Revenue Collective. A. K A. It's not the Revenue Collective anymore. It is now Pavilion. And this is what we wanted to be discussing today. We have a packed show. We have guests coming on and we really want to hear from SAm about everything about the changes that are going on. What's going to be coming in the next year and the next year and a half for the Pavilion and as well, kind of what's new. We have so many announcements that are being made and we're breaking news here on the Pavilion podcast, so we're breaking a lot of news. Yeah, well with that all meat. No filler. Let's jump. Let's go. Let's go. And then, uh, and then play the millennial music. Do we have the soundboard ready tom's got his millennial music Anyway, Alright, let's go. Let's, let's get started. Oh, Jack. Oh, we're doing pulling a Jacko isn't out. All right, Let's get serious. Sam tell us what is going on. What do you do here? You change the name of the company? You change the name of the group? Today is the day. If it's june 22nd putting ourselves into the future, we're obviously recording this before june 22nd. Today is the day that were, is the for our first ever, it's going to be our annual event next year. It'll be in person. It's called, transformed 2020. This year it's called transform. So this year it's transformed 2021 Next year, it will be in person. We're incredibly excited about that back to in person events and today, through transformed 2021, we're announcing a number of different things. First, we're announcing that we have a new name. Revenue collective. As you said, Brandon is no more, there is no more operations collective. There is only one pavilion, there can be only one pavilion. Uh, I can explain why we're changing the name, but that's thing number one thing, number two, it sort of depends like what order is most interesting to people. But Thing # two, we're announcing that we've crossed 5000 members Which was run out of out of reach goal. When I first started working on this full time back in December of 2018. The third thing we're announcing is that we're announcing, I think four new schools, but I don't have all in front of me right now. I will when we do the actual transform event. So we're announcing, we already have for folks out there included in membership, this is England in membership, C. R. O. School, Frontline Manager School Revenue Growth Architecture School led by Jack Lovander, Coy and rev. Ops Summer school led by Rosalind Santillana. Here's what we've got for the fall. We've got rev ups fall semester, a longer, more intensive course. We've got CMO school, Chief Marketing Officer School for people that inspire VPs marketing that want to be CMoS, We've got chief customer officer School for directors and VP of customer success that want to enter the C suite. And then we've actually got a community leadership school where we're going to be certifying people on how to build and lead their own communities. Obviously, we hope that they do that under the broad umbrella is not the word. Under the poles of guidance. The guidance, it's like a big tent, you know, it's under the Pavilion Pavilion within Pavilion. Um we've got more coming, where I don't know if we're announcing it today, but we're definitely building SDR School, we're definitely building Sales school, which is really for account executives and individual contributors. Maybe Tommy will be part of an instructor in that school and really all of our different functional Pavilions will have schools associated with them and then individual courses over time, associated with them as well, where you can receive training and certification. So that's another thing that we're announcing really in some ways, the launch of what I would call Pavilion University. That's a thing we're...

...announcing. We're also announcing that we've acquired two communities. We've acquired Fin Ops, which is a community focused on finance professionals and financial operations professionals. And we've acquired SDR defenders, which is a community focused on obviously Sdrs uh with that we are launching. So right now, I mean, this is a lot of stuff, I wonder if we should have spread it out. But anyway, we've got, we've got right now an associate community and an executive community associated for from five years of work experience through VP. So roughly, maybe like director or manager level, through VP executive VP and above with the acquisition of SDR defenders were announcing, our analyst community, analyst community is for people in their first five years of work. It will include sDRs, it will include individual contributors. Pavilion is not about just sales, marketing and CS anymore, it's about all functions. So it will really be the analyst community will be for anybody in any function that's in their first period of work. So that's another thing we're announcing. And then, you know, for some people, this is the only thing that they actually care about. We're announcing that we've successfully closed to $25 million dollar financing led by elephant Ventures with participation from GTM Fund, Maxwell, Schuyler's Fund of which many revenue collective members are LPS. So as a function of that many revenue collective members are now investors in the new entity, which is Pavilion. Can we pause right there for my drop first of all, that is the entire length of my podcast. So, uh, if you're a regular listener, my podcast, you can just stop right here. Great. You were done on my restaurant recommendations. Ready Brandon. Uh, if you ever if you've ever been to Bennigan's, if you were going to crowd you out, we don't want to talk about. All right. That's a slight drop announcement. It's a lot of announcements. I'm starting to think maybe we should have spread them out, but we got more announcements coming anyway. So um yeah, I mean, I can ask me some questions. I'll give you I'll tell you know, lies. So when I hear you announce all those things, the first thing I think of as like who needs an NBA anymore. That's interesting, depends. I don't know. I mean, I there's a lot of, listen, we're not, you know, there's other companies out there. There are very specific kind of like talk tracks that people have about quote unquote disrupting the NBA disrupting education. I think we may end up doing that or we may be part of a movement that does that. But I personally, that's not motivating for me one way or the other, to be completely honest, like I'm not, I didn't like come out of these ideas because like I just needed to be a ceo and like I you know, looked for an industry to disrupt and then went through an incubator and like met with Ben Horowitz or something like that, like I'm doing this not about disrupting the NBA, we're doing it because we want to help human beings achieve, unlock and achieve what I call their professional potential, which is really a way of saying all of us have greatness Within us and we want to help bring that out so that people can get where they want to go in their careers, so that when we stop working, we can look back on 30, 40, 50 years and be proud of what we did and have the things that we hope to have when we set out money, impact fulfillment, a sense of well being and contentment and hopefully peace and happiness. That's, that's why I'm doing it to bring that to as many people as I can not because I'm trying to disrupt the NBA. Although that may end up being what happens. I mean to me it's a little bit post that, right? I mean, I'm sure there are many people in the, in the pavilion communities that are not, don't have an NBA, don't plan on ever getting an NBA, but there is this certainly this idea that we never have to stop learning. I'm nearly 40 years old. I just recently picked up an additional new mentor who might be, I think he's in his mid-50s, but he actually said to me, I hope that you also pay this forward as you know, I'm entering, you, you mentor others. And I said, yeah, I'm actually an entrepreneur in residence at Cornell and I'm mentoring younger people. So like there's ways for people at every stage in their career to be learning and to be passing on learning. And I think it's a little bit of that bi directional thing where in an M. B. A. Program or college or anything, it's really one direction you go there, you get an education, you are amongst peers, there's something I know there's something more special about being part of, I always felt like this was like an alumni association, this isn't one program at one time, this is you will now be part of this thing for your, for your life. Yeah, I hope so. I mean, you know, to the point I have this thing that I've been saying recently, which is, you know, for most technology companies, you know, the software, the lines of code are their technology, right? And for us, what is the vision? Because that's probably one of the questions and I can go at length about the vision, but the fundamental part of it is that our values, the values of Pavilion are our technology and the world that we're trying to build is a world and I mean that very and it's not...

...just like a throwaway line, it's not cheeky because you see it, the whole concept of paying forward is scalable. That's replication like, like lines of code in a software, right? Like when you learn how to do something, like be nice to somebody and you learn that by being nice to somebody and helping them and helping them find a job and being supportive and not asking for anything in return that you teach them that that's a way to do things and then they go out and they are helpful to somebody and nice to somebody and they do things for people without asking immediately for you, no compensation or for some kind of remuneration, what you're doing is you're scaling, you are scaling the that those specific types of values every time you model the behavior that you learn from somebody else, you're scaling values and that's what my goal is. Again, learning is interesting, what I really want for people beyond their ability to learn beyond training and certification. All of the things that we do, what I really want for them is what I want for myself, which is happiness to be completely honest. Like that's really the work for me is about helping people achieve peace and contentment and happiness in their lives through work. I can tell you firsthand for those of you that just rolled your eyes. That actually Sam means this because I was fortunate enough to be around during the very early days of this and when Sam was even having, you know, working his own for a full time job before revenue collected was a thing certainly before it was a full time thing. And it's almost, I mean, look, maybe we dive into this now. I mean the origins of this are that there was a bunch of folks in new york who wanted to talk about the problems that they have at work, not necessarily just the problems, but the challenges they face. Talk to other like minded professionals. But in some of those conversations came up the here's what shitty about working for this person or this VC or this SAS company or whatever or here's what's bad about our jobs. Like how do we make it better to dive into some of some of the early, early days of of Revenue collective of pavilion. I mean what was day 1? It was like the first dinner. What was the first? I would, I think it's probably the first dinner. Honestly, honestly was a conversation I had with a woman named Joanna current I guess maybe she's now Joanna current Cunningham. She worked for me at Axial. She was ahead of member success and we were just talking and we were talking about the challenges that we had and that I had even though she was, you know, my direct report, we're sort of friends and peers and she said you should create something where you can have these conversations with other people and you should be the one that creates it because I think I believe in you. And that was like 2013 2014. And so we started, I started just reaching out to people saying hey do you want to meet for dinner? And that was me and a bunch of smb for it was brian Rakowski and David Greenberger and Adam Liebman and Katie Sullivan who was an early employee at Yelp. And we just started having dinner together. But the other thing that was happening to your point Brandon is like about me, meaning is like I was just, I started to just try, I just started trying to I got a thrill. I got a kick out of like helping people find jobs and giving people like advice and helping them work through situations and then having them expect me to ask them for something and not doing that. I just got like a weird thrill out of like yeah, I don't need anything from you, I'm going to help you do this here. Take it, take the document, take my workbook, take my playbook like I don't want anything for it. And that Like I worked with a coach to develop a more like a codification of those values and ultimately I would also say that it started some rambling a little bit but that's because there is no like I don't think there's a single point of origin for this which makes it really organic and interesting. But one of the inflection points was definitely getting fired from the muse in 2017 and me being frustrated that I continue to be sort of tossed on the seas of other people's whims, you know other companies and I said I need to create an additional revenue stream for myself just so I don't go crazy. And so that was when I started charging dues on january 1st 2018 is 50 bucks a month for like 20 people. But that was in many ways the beginning of like the business side of it, right? What were they paying for? Well, they're paying to be friends with me. I mean that was the joke. You know, I was like, they were paying for me, Kiva Holstein, whose C. R. O. Of Alphasense used to say Sam's my camp counselor and that's what they were paying for. They were paying because I would organize the dinners, I would stimulate the conversation. I would screen new members. I put together the google group. They were paying for administration and logistics because everybody wants this kind of thing, but not everybody wants to put them energy or the time or the thoughtfulness into doing it. And I think they were also paying for just like the point of view that I had frankly, because, you know, obviously every company reflects the...

...personality of their founder or the people that created the company. And I think this one is no exception. And I think people identified with sort of how I viewed the world. I mean, previous two people paying, there were many dinners and you know, I remember what was David's company. David old, very right. It was born raised, uh, you know, for Manny and here we go. We have uh, let's, we could we could drop a little all right. First drop in guest of the day is near this is the perfect time, Michael. We're talking a little bit about the early days of the dinners that we would we would go to before sam started charging us to be his friend. So well, Manny was that mike Manni, who I wish you'd let him. Would we allow Mike a little bit of the space to introduce yourself. I'm sorry. Thanks for having me thrilled to be here and even the sound effects Fantastic. Yeah. And the R O I on those dinners is amazing. 1000 X or more three to be here. Yeah. Mike Mandy, I was an early member, was gracious for Sam Brennan and others to invite me to those early dinners which were fantastic right now. I lead revenue for a company called Oculus of Fintech infrastructure company in new york city. But at the time a bunch of us worked in the HR space I spend time most notably at namely during that time, Yeah, you're well. And the other thing about Michael Manny is that everybody wants to debate this. He was the very when I sent out the link to pay dues and I want namely was like one of the hottest companies in new york at the time. And so it was like them in greenhouse and I desperately wanted manny and marc Jacobs to be part of the thing and manny was the first person to pay the dues. He was the very first revenue collective member paying member ever. Well where to go on the first sucker I found him no first money in first money in. So that was for share. Uh look, I mean there's going to be a lot of first that we talked about today. Obviously we're talking about the origins of revenue collected were also talking about the first member from your perspective you ever think we'd be sitting here talking about? I mean what you said over 10,000 members, we've crossed 5000. It's incredible. It's incredible the growth. I mean huge testament sam for all the time, energy effort you put into executing on this. But it's it's amazing. I mean I remember the early dinners you talked about bringing like, well first you always remember food with great people and those are the fondest memories, a couple of places, rosa mexicano, R I B, but a bunch of the others that we went to and you know, it wasn't just that, it was, you know, camaraderie community, the stories we would hear, you know, being able folks that could relate to the challenges you were going through on a day in and day out basis was amazing. It was such like you could let your guard down and a breath of fresh air and also walk away with like a bunch of great ideas and tips that you could go implement. You know, the too many hours we were working the rest of that week. Yeah, I mean I, I, the thing that I pull away or like the memory that is so bright in my mind and this is sitting at one side of the table and hoping that SAm didn't start the circle, you have a problem that you're facing on my side. So hopefully by the time the entrees came, it would have stopped already and I didn't have to tell everyone how much of a rookie I was compared to half of the titans that we're sitting at that table guys, I really want to understand how to be an SDR or I don't even know what, like what, uh, uh, but you know, I can just remember, everybody had to say who they were, where they're working and you have to bring up a problem and you had to jump in on it. Yeah, totally. And I do remember those days and it was funny because, you know, we had a lot of B to B folks there, but whenever you would hear somebody else was like, oh, I'm scaling a consumer, I'm like, I have no idea what you're doing with the consumer marketplace and cannot help at all. Well enjoy the food, but it was amazing. I mean, I do recall that Brandon, like you're right, but a lot of times you would sit there and say, wow, like that, that is also a problem we're having. And you would learn a taunt from just hearing that you weren't alone. You know, that there was a lot of other folks out there facing, you know, those same challenges and ideas on how to solve them and things implement etcetera. And man, just like throwing from your side like any, you know, four years, I guess, three years later from any cool stories that you have of either people you've met through Pavilion, as we call it today. Does mandy know all the announcements. He joined after we've made all these announcements. Well, for the sake of our podcast guests here, maybe we shouldn't run through them again. But Manny, we're changing the name. Yeah, exactly. The main thing is, it's called Pavilion now. It's no longer called Revenue Collective. Great. Well that's awesome. I mean a new name is always fun. Good luck on the rebrand and search optimization. No, I'm just kidding. That's awesome. Uh, it's...

...amazing though. No, that's awesome. And I do have, you know, Brandon, you mentioned some fond memories, I do remember, you know, it was funny, there's a couple of good memories and of course a few of the folks I've since referred, it's always great to go to some of those and be able to like pass it down, you know, have other folks who came out and was like, hey, great ideas on how to scale the SDR team. I think one thing was around team building, some people make great recommendations on events we ended up doing, was it called like laser tag one time afterwards. Somebody had recommended some cool team events that didn't only involve going to a bar, which I'm okay. And also and those were good. And then, you know, I do recall there was a couple of times, of course we're all in that group and I'd have to pick on, I could not pick on rob Lopez because of course like just works and namely, and we would see like some limited overlap. But it was interesting to always talk about like, you know, him and others, you know, Mark Jacobson and others would give good ideas on like higher scale in your str team and tips and tricks and play books and things like that and you didn't have to worry about it. I do remember one dinner though and rob. I apologize accidentally introducing myself as like, oh and your little companies use just works and we got bigger companies use namely, I was just kidding, I wasn't trying to offend you rob, but we would talk like, you know, you would be able to really let your guard down like I said, and be able to share ideas and tips and tricks and it was always super helpful to learn from some other, you know, many great folks who had already gotten to where we were or you know, we're a little bit of a head or right around the same size. So how long were these dinners going on before you were the first customers this year's? Was this like once a month for Years or it wasn't once a month, it was like once a quarter. I think we probably started doing them in 2016. So probably about two years. And then at some point sales loft actually. And it was Kevin O Malley who is a really our biggest, he was our first kind of early champion. And so he partnered to start paying for the dinners. So like the first thing that happened was that we stopped having to pay for them and then, and they never forget, not the person who picked up the Yeah, yeah. And he was VP of marketing for sales loft at the time. And then we started charging dues, January, one, sales off then became like, then I extracted more money from them and they paid up sponsorship in addition to paying for all the dinners and then they got a new CMO and um, you know, as sometimes happens when you lose your champion, there was just a little bit of disruption in the relationship and that's when max swooped in and it was right at the time that sales hacker was sold to outreach and so all of a sudden max was flush with capital and he said, well we will pick up the tab for all of the, all of the revenue collective events at the time. I mean by the way, the dinner is being free was important so people could come and be unencumbered by like, you know, cost whatever, but also talk about immediate value to the dues that you're paying right, like, you know, you're paying dues to this thing, you get a dinner once in a while, these were not shabby places. I remember picking some of them for you Sam as I was the resident restaurant guy in your world. And then you meet great people. I mean like what a no brainer. And of course you sam you saw the vision then to bring it to this level. We're now actually. I mean people are getting together in their cities doing basically the same thing just in their city in their chapter and sharing ideas and doing it in slack and doing in different places. Yeah, I don't know that. I saw the vision then I just have oh yeah, I just I what I call is pull the thread. You know, I just keep doing the next right thing that my customers who are our members tell us to do. That's kind of the way that I think about strategy most of the time my people were at these dinners. Go ahead. Now, I'm just curious like back in the day these dinners were talking like 12 people because you gotta you gotta limit it, right? You can't have 15 to 2015 2020 and I have a very price precise to the point of manny's comments, like a precise playbook and Brandon's comments on like how do you run a dinner? that was probably another thing that the $50 went to, which is like, there's an hour cocktails first, then you sit down, no cross talk, Right? So only one person talking at a time and basically you workshop like case studies through appetizers and entrees as people get more and more drunk and then dessert time you get to cross talk, but also everybody has to contribute and participate. So if you see somebody, because otherwise what will happen is, you know, if Kiva is there, he'll just talk the entire time and other people won't get a chance to contribute. There's always, you know, I'm just kidding about cuba but you know, there's always like a couple of people that are a little bit loud mouthy that will dominate. And so you want to just make sure that everybody gets a chance to participate, especially especially, you know, to the point of this, we don't have any women on here now, hopefully there's some coming. But Oh there's an how about that? For a time.

Come on. It's time we let and uh a little but I wanted to say thanks to Sam Brannan and everyone who's made pavilion now possible. And here's to the next like 10. Oh thank you so much and congrats to you, my great. See anybody pink? What's up? Hello. All right. And why don't you do us the pleasure of introducing yourself and tell us what you do. Of course. Well, first of all, congratulations on the 100th episode. This is very exciting. I'm thrilled to be included. I'm Andrew seem VP of operations at Pavilion. Nay, Revenue Collective. That is a nice way to put it as today is a lot of firsts. It's the first day of Pavilion. It's the, we had our first paying member of the Pavilion community. Ak the Revenue Collective Community. Nay nay, I got to learn how to do that Nathan and you were the first person to go and work with Sam that's right. Employee number one. Hard to believe it was uh, well, it's funny, you know, sometimes when Sam and I are feeling nostalgic about Revenue Collective if we have this email exchange, when he got in touch with me and said, how's your job search going? Because I think I have something at one of my companies, the revenue collective, but I'm not sure if it would align with your career goals and we, we have a screenshot of this email and we send it back and forth to each other from time to time and I have to say that it aligns with my career goals. So thank you so much Sam well thank you. You've been amazing. It's been amazing to work with you. The feeling was that first job. Yeah, What was that? First job was the first job. I was operations manager. I think it was a title that we invented and SAm and I were both, we were both part time at that point, SAM still had his full time job and I had a few other consulting projects and we just, we both did it all. I mean between the two of us, we interviewed every single perspective member, which is just wild to think about now that we have an entire department devoted to member growth. And we stopped a lot of gift bags, a lot of swag bags, we planned parties together and was helpful in printing name cards and like the logistics behind a lot of our events and then as we grew and designed all of our workflows and became our infrastructure person. So she stood up our hubspot instance, she made it so that when you drag somebody to a different stage and email automatically goes out. I mean all of the things, yeah, it's been a lot of fun, especially the swag bag stuffing. We had a day, you know, Brandon, I think you were at the boat day on into that summer of 2019. Absolutely, It was a lobster boat, right? For like 40 something street, Right, No lobsters. But yes, it was that was the right now. I'm not saying that it was a it was near there. It was near that one or near there was near there. Well, whenever I talked to anyone about boats, they talk about how wonderful it was and the speakers and the breakout sessions and the sailing around the statue of Liberty. And and it was fantastic. But when I think about that event, I think about the day before When Sam and I were doing the prep and it was one of those 90°, 100% humidity days and we were on that boat in advance stuffing the swag bags with Riley are inter internet. And I've never told you this before stand. But that was like a real turning point for me as far as viewing you as a leader. because there could have been any number of times where you could have said, I'm out. You know, I got to prepare my remarks or you know, thanks for your help. But you stayed there the whole day with us and we were all just drenched and I that's when I was really like what this person will get in the trenches with me, I'm going to get in the trenches with him. So it was quite a day. Oh, don't make me verklempt. That's wonderful. Thank you for saying that now. I definitely probably will say I have my remarks peace. Well, I know that speaks to you know what what we've been doing this whole time has remained unchanged. That, you know, we have a bigger boat now and we have more help thankfully. But doing whatever it takes, if it means making a better member experience, I would like to let you both know that the only, this is the longest relationship I've ever had with a pair of sunglasses is the sunglasses I got from the from the boat because it's impossible to lose bright white Miami Beach sunglasses, which Sam assured me we're polarized and I don't think my wife will not let me wear them and it's not fair because I love them. I have a few pairs. I have the lip balm. I have the tote bags. I mean I love...

...swag so and these are all and one of the things we've learned about Anna's that she loves swag, she loves it. And it's all collector's items now. Yeah, that's retro vintage vintage Revenue Collective. So tell me about the early days and I'm the new kid on the block here. I've been a member for about a year and a half and co host of the podcast, but I I love these old stories. So like when you were in that spot and your career, like you were consulting and you probably sounds like a new SAm from other experience, like why did you decide to do that? Like you're joining this thing where he's just like running quarterly dinners and you're like, oh, that sounds like a great idea, like I'm gonna take that with my career, like what made you buy in on it? Oh, that's a good question. Well, we, you know, as I said, we were both working part time, so we had time to kind of feel each other out and see where this was going and it really became evident quite quickly that there was something here and you know, I had changed careers, I'm I was a practicing attorney for many years in new york, but I was hungry for something different, more entrepreneurial, I wanted to learn and grow and build and so I'm just so grateful and proud that Sam took a chance on me and brought me in to build this thing because immediately to hear from the members, I mean I was interviewing people meeting with members from the beginning, how thankful people were to have the community around them, how much we could support them and help them by connecting them with other people are providing them with resources. There was a real spark happening and a real energy even around that initial smaller group. Um, and now to be able to extend that to thousands of people all over the world and you get to have that kind of impact every day, it's incredible. And at what point, I mean, I don't know if it would have been a particular point, but at what point might you have said to yourself, oh shit, this is going to be big, right? Like, I mean it could have been, you know, and I'm not saying this is something, but this is going to be worldwide, you know, going to impact people, like hundreds of people's lives every single month, right? Thousands, well, but I'm just, there is particular moment for each Revenue Collector Pavilion member where, I mean there was one recently, you know, I got introduced to somebody and maybe fred will bring this up and I introduced him to somebody else and he got a job there, right, like, and that that change that person's life that moment. So like I would like to think everyone gets that moment once a month, but probably you know, and for you, when was it? When would you, like this is huge? I don't know if I can pinpoint a time, but there was definitely a feeling of momentum. It was probably when we started getting a big influx of folks who wanted to be chapter heads and the chapter expansion was really taken off and these, these people wanted to affiliate themselves in a meaningful way in a leadership role with us and really attached their brands to us to then go out and help other people in their community. I remember building some of the initial landing pages for our first core group of chapters. Maybe there were five and then another would trickle in and another. But then I remember there was a time where I had like a list of 7 to 10 that needed to be added because there were just all these people who wanted to be leaders within the revenue collective community. And that was really powerful. Yeah, it's good that you started with revenue. People are awfully ambitious. Sam So it was a good, it was a good place to start. I want, I want to do it. I want to be a leader. I want to do this. Well it's and I have I have the notes from the december 14th 2019 RC executive off site. Um, and uh probably you 100 urgent. You brought delicious pretzels to that meeting. I did. I was a little bit late and I'm not even on the attendee list, but I I brought delicious pretzels and it was, I mean that meeting to me was when I started thinking, man, this thing is a big thing. And just for the record, your prediction at the end of 2020 for how many members there would be is like close to spot on. You said you said 40. 4500 to a little over where I think that they were. But different things, different courses that happened, might have might have let that happen. We're closer than Sam was, I think In spirit, even though the number might have been closer, but I think this said that there was three current chapters at that point and then six more coming. And then the big highlight was that there was 90 people who signed up to become part of the revenue collective in Q4. So just just an incredible growth, wow, There's a man DLJ is in the house. Mr Jacobs, How are you? Mr...

Jackson, So excited to be here. Congratulations. Thank you. Welcome. Welcome. Welcome. So great. I'm not only uh, sorry, I was just going to welcome Devante and I was going to say, not only is he a guest, but he we are his customer because uh because we are we are slack users. Anyway. Damonte good to see you. And let's get you know, all of our guests here, we're going to give a final final word if you want one. And it can't be congratulating sand because screw that a final word. Well, if I can't congratulate him, I'll just say thank you. It's been the pleasure of my career. And I really feel like in a lot of ways I've grown up right alongside revenue collective and every professional success that I've had has been a result of working either working alongside SAM or utilizing the very community that we're building. I mean to have access to revenue collected from my own professional growth has been incredible. And those benefits then just get poured back into the membership because I work here everyday. So, it's really a beautiful cycle and it's thanks to you Sam so thank you. Well thank you and it's been an incredible journey and I can't wait for many more years to come. And uh it's just been a real mitzvah for both of us. So thank you. I'm about to cry right now, brings that out exactly to the mountain we go. Mhm. Devante and I'm going to follow that up. Let's let's let's turn the corner on the uh why don't you give us the pleasure of introducing yourself? Oh wow, okay, so my name's Devonte Louis Jackson. Currently I am an account executive at slack, but prior to slack I've worked at a few other companies and this all really started for me at the muse, that's where I started my career and that's where I met Sam Jacobs. So I had a really great opportunity to work with and learn from SAM directly when he was R. C. R. O. And as Revenue Collective Group. I had an opportunity to work alongside him on some initiatives and also received similar to and set the direct benefits, which I'm happy, very happy to talk about just being involved in this community and getting things going. So I've known SaM at this point for coming up on five years. Coming up in five years. Yeah, it's four years, definitely, but it'll be five years soon. Devante, first of all, you've got to, what is that noise? I don't understand that sound effect. It's a classic, uh sounds like a Devante. First and foremost, you've got an outstanding background for your video quality. I really enjoy it. Um I'm here. I think a lot of listeners would be curious about Sam Jacobs, C. R. O. Of five years ago. You have any any interesting stories or tidbits from those days? I do um quick on the background, we just moved into our apartment so you'll see that it's real, it's not a zoom background but those are definitely stock photos. It's the same picture. We haven't put the put the new picture, that's the same. That's amazing. Um think about what I think about saying when he joined the muse, he really did change the direct trajectory of the business at that time, right? We immediately started selling bigger deals and strategic selling went from being a buzzword and something we aspired to, something we were able to take into action. So we had a bigger sense of pride in what we were doing. So I think the two things that I talk about briefly, number one I cannot go without talking about Sam's 4 30 friday afternoon meeting before the weekend, which we know tons of folks, especially in startup world. They're trying to cut out at 3 45 trying to get out of there. So I think it definitely got some virals when it was first implemented, but it turned out to bring the team together because everyone who touched the customer lifecycle from marketing, who were focused on getting leads, Sdrs who were qualifying eighties who were closing deals on boarding sales support. Everyone was on the floor talking about their wins for the week and we were winning, we're winning big and that felt really good. So what started off as a shock when everyone wanted to start their weekends early definitely turned into a good culture building exercise and it made people excited for that meeting. And you left on a high note feeling good. I also think on a more personal note, I was working on a pretty, pretty good sized deal with a national consumer company and I let the team know that I was getting ready to send up a doctor sign and Sam somehow got wind of this. It comes over to my desk and says, this is great. Call them when you send the doctor sign and do not hang up the phone until they sign the contract. I don't care what they say, I don't care if they have to route it. You stay on the phone until the document is executed. I'm like, who does this? But he said it so confidently, like it's been done 1000 times before. So I did it and it worked. And uh later that day I let him know like sam it work, doctor sign is good. And he looked at me and said, shit, it worked. And I was like, what? But that's that's the confidence you need from a sales leader to push...

...you in the right direction to get outside of yourself and to make things happen. And I'll always just remember that story of like just push yourself a little bit, do something that makes you uncomfortable and you'll be successful and I'm sure everyone has stories of SAM just giving him a nudge and uh turning out to be a positive situation. That's very nice of you do want to thank you for saying that. I mean it helped. I mean, listen, I uh what I'll say is for for revenue collectives and I know, you know, it's it's not just talking about it, but you've realized very early on that there was a need to have a community and not only that, but you built revenue collective out of a community that existed, right? It was friends, leaders, executives getting together kind of, you know, talking shop, but also giving advice. And then what grew from there is, you know, what we're all experiencing now, which turned into the podcast and turn it into the opportunities. You wouldn't be one of our customers if one of my customers, if I didn't actually get to slack and I wouldn't be at slack without you and the revenue collective. So yeah, I'll stop being doing a P. S. A. De monte. When did you join the revenue collective? I want to say The spring of 2019. Yeah. Yeah. So it's really early on. He was the first, uh, there was a group of seven associates. They were the very first associates. And they would, we would, I was their leader mentor, whatever. And we would all meet as a group once a month. And we had a curriculum that is actually informs a lot of what we do with this program. Rising executives and Devante was part of it. Yeah, it was, it was pretty cool, top notch breakfast sandwiches too and I would buy everybody breakfast saM, there's a theme here where you just buy people food and they show up to stuff. That's the playbook, right? It works for me. And then how far thereafter did the both of you start to formulate the idea around revenue, Collective of color and you know, having more initiatives surrounding diversity is that fall? So we started the associated program, which is great in terms of helping us build a perspective on what a good company looks like, how to negotiate how you can be impactful even as an individual contributor. And that fall, I was invited to join one of the off sites, which I cannot wait to have in person defense again. And you know, during that off site, it was fantastic. I loved the insight that I was getting the people that was introduced to. But can we talk to Sam about how do we get more folks that look like me and have similar backgrounds into that room as well? And he immediately was like, what can we do, how do we get this going? So in a span of a few weeks, we spun up the idea, we started reaching out to folks to see exactly how we can kick things off and I could, can I share numbers and information that you can share with everyone, several 100 folks that are now in our C. O C, which is pretty cool. It's amazing. I'm really excited to see the impact that we're having and creating a community revenue collective, but then also creating a safe space within it for people of color, trying to learn more about how to navigate their career. And it's doing a really good job. You did a great job, get enough figure out different. So just been uh, so much fun and an honor to get to know you and work with you over the past four years. Likewise, I can't wait to officially work together in some capacity, way down the line. For now. It's going to keep taking what I learned that revenue collective and helping me do my thing. I absolutely give Brynn some tips. Lamont, please stick around, hang out with us. But we, it seems like we have another guest has arrived. It looks like it. Um, you know, it's golden hours in the middle of the afternoon, so I'm gonna get back to it. But I really appreciate you all having me. I will say congratulations of Sand but also say thanks for everything that you all have been doing podcast is great. I'll see you all soon. Thanks a lot. Thanks for coming. Hi Nicole. Hey, how are you? Good. It's great to see you. Thanks for having me here. Nicole, we this of course is a podcast. This is 1/100 episode we were talking through basically the history of the revenue collective. You are one of the first chapter Heads right to break off and be one of one of the leaders in terms of revenue collective chapter Head in Atlanta. Would you do us the honor of introducing yourself? Sure. So hi everyone. Thank you so much for having me and congrats on 100 episodes here. That's amazing. So, Nicole smith, I lead the Atlanta chapter of Revenue Collective and I'm the VP of marketing at tackle you. Also, I think I have the distinct honor of having the most appearances on the podcast, which might be three wow has been many hosts throughout the series and I think I was the third not realizing you had been on before, but we had a fun conversation. So that's, that's all that matters right now. Things are open again. We can go out to these nice dinners that we talked about when I was on the podcast. So you promised me that you were buying me a tasting menu in Atlanta? Yeah, it was the opposite way around. But you know, whatever, whatever you know. Well welcome. Thank...

...you. Thanks for having me. So, Nicole tell us about, tell listeners, When did the Atlanta chapter open? How long have you been a member? Talk about the early days of you and Revenue Collective. Yeah, I was just thinking about that. It was actually about a little more than two years ago where I officially became a member. And I remember that when I was joining. So I was referred by Kyle Lacy, who's the Indianapolis chapter head. And I actually had an interview with SAM to join and I was so nervous because I was like, ok, I know who this is and I'm really scared, like I wonder if he's gonna accept me and let me join this because I think it sounds amazing. I'd really like to be part of it and he did let me join. So that was awesome. And on the call, he was like, you know, you're going to be the first Atlanta member, so you should think about running the chapter. And it's like, I don't really know, that seems like a lot of work or I don't know if I could do that and when people even want me to be a chapter head and could I do that and I mean just so quickly, I just once I got in the group I was like this is the most amazing community I've ever been a part of and I just started telling everyone in my network about it that I had been in previous communities with and it just kind of started growing organically if people joining and Sam was like Nicole, you're kind of doing the work of a chapter had already like why don't I come down to Atlanta will have a happy hour and you know maybe think about making this official and we did, we had an amazing happy hour, you know, probably had about 30 or so people there and I just realized like the power of this Atlanta community and what sam was building in the mission and how I could help grow it as well. And then quickly after that, decided to make it official of becoming the chapter head. So not still two years in as an official chapter had been tears and as a member and I think we have a little more than 200 people now in the Atlantic community, it's been amazing. Can I say that we talk often that Nicole is the model of what we think a great chapter head should be. So she just works, she does the work of making sure that everybody feels welcome and our business is driven by Nps by net promoter score really, which is a way of saying it's driven by a survey where we asked the same customer satisfaction question over time to as many people as possible and Atlanta consistently receives top marks and it's because of the way that Nicole makes people feel about how they feel welcome and they feel supported and they feel like she's going to go to great lengths to help them figure out their problems. So thank you Nicole. Uh well thanks. I love doing it and I don't know, I just, I didn't realize how much I would love it and just, it's been so fulfilling for me to do this and to have this role and I love helping connect people, help people out, whether they're in a tough spot in their career or they're looking for help on a certain topic and I can help point them in the right direction. I mean, it really is just one of the most fulfilling things I've ever done? Nicole. What are some of the best stories of people connecting and finding real growth in their career coming out of Atlanta? Like give us some kind of on the, you know, we're talking a lot about the old days, we're talking a lot about, you know, give us some on the ground like what happens when you join and you're part of a chapter and you know the people in your city and like what are some of the benefits of that? Yeah, I mean I think there's just so many cool stories that I've heard from Atlanta. You know, it's like one of the members of my chapter, he was on a lunch roulette call and um a bunch of letters where two people get paired up every two weeks, they can have like, you know, kind of a 30 minute colleges to get to know each other virtually. And the marketing member mentioned that they were looking for a new sales leader, well then you know that sales leader was looking for a new role that he was talking to. And so he ended up soon after that taking that sales leader role at his company. And so I mean that's just like one of many cool stories, I feel like that happens in revenue collective. You know, I had another member of mine that she came in, she was looking for a new role and she was excited about, you know, working with revenue collective to helpfully like Network and look at new opportunities. And she had, I think she interviewed for 10 different jobs and seven of those came through revenue collective that she had found. And then the one she ended up taking was actually with a fellow revenue collective. Remember that she's reporting to right now? So I mean, I think that's a huge piece of it is like, you know, jobs and career transitions, but so many like of the small day to day things I hear from people are just like, Hey, I didn't know how to do this for a board deck or I'm going into a new go to market motion and things like that. And I was, I joined like this small council for cmos or Cros or you know, the front line, you know, str managers and gosh was able to have these conversations or I didn't really think people would respond to me with, you know, I had this question all of a sudden I had five people saying they would jump on a call with me and help me out. Like this is insane. I just blows people's minds. I think how responsive people are really willing to be and giving up their time when I...

...think you go into so many other slack communities and it's just people either pitching you or just posting on slack and no one's really being responsive and engaging. Nicole. That that brings up one of the reasons why I love the community so much as I was thinking about this the other day, it's kind of like the blue checkmark on twitter for being in revenue. It like kind of gives you that instant credibility if you're reaching out, if it's about a job, it's about help for something, if it's just connecting with someone that's like minded that when I do that and it's a fellow member, I get a response. I mean if it's not 10 out of 10 times, it's, it's at least eight or nine out of 10 compared to maybe a cold email or a linkedin message, which can be, take it or leave it. So it just, it just seems like such a verification that we're all in this together and if you're in this group and I'm in this group were bound to help each other out somehow. That's such a great way to put it. I love that. You said it all right there tom that's the point of Pavilion, because Nicole, we were talking uh they're all, we don't have to go through all of the announcements were going to make uh, for today, but obviously we're changing the name and we're going to open it up to more professions and more functional areas and we're launching with the Finance Pavilion. But the point is That that is the technology, the technology is the values like that's exactly what I like and I want there to be, if there's 800 million people on linkedin, is it possible for me? Like the core ingredients to be a great member are you have to have work ethic meaning like you want, you have to want to improve and change where you are like whether you call it constantly learning or whatever, but you have to want to put in the work and then you have to have compassion and if you have those two things then we can teach you a way to behave that is not, that is obvious as a human being, but isn't promulgated in the rest of the workforce about responsiveness and support and help exactly to the stories that you all are saying and we can teach millions of people that like that's a possible way to succeed, that you don't have to be a dickhead. You don't have to be short term thinking, you don't have to just be self aggrandizing, it doesn't have to just be about you. If you help somebody, you don't immediately need to send them a bill that like there's lots of ways to succeed in one of the ways to succeed is this common code of like, oh, it's like you said the blue checkmark, it's like that's another member. I'm going to be helpful to them because they'll be helpful to me when I need it. Exactly. I kind of usually will say is like revenue collectives, no assholes. Like everyone there is just like here for a good purpose of helping others succeed, why their success, Trying to help themselves 62 and I'll just say like it saved me months of time with everything I've learned and done and been able to pull from other people and their resources and it saved me making a lot of bad decisions to, by being able to like already validate what other people have done as well. What's up are you okay? I'm great. I'm probably, I'm like half frozen here on the camera. That's fun. Uh a pleasure to have you on. Thank you so much for being here. Any last words for Sam as we as we congratulate him on all the amazing stuff going on. Thank you so much Sam for building this amazing community and being so awesome to work with along the way. I love it. And just thanks for letting me be a part of this. I love working with you. You're awesome and I hope to see you in person soon. Yes, we're all going at Nicole Sam's bringing us to both time. Yeah. Right. Hi, one door closes and another opens and looking for we have here. First of all, she had such nice things to say. I know this is clearly doesn't roasting part of the were a Tommy. You really have you been doing the shots as you promise? Yeah, every time one person comes in, I've been sneakily taking a shot of jack Daniels. So I will be uh don't even 21 tom. That's I don't even know you're allowed to drink, keep that on the hush hush. Don't tell your mom. Brandon is spending all of his time on Andrew, we can hear you, but Brandon spending all of his time on the show looking for annoying sound effects so he's not participating. So good. I wanted to be like a shock jock radio host with my sambal and ready to go, wow, doing that. Can we, can we give you an opportunity to introduce yourself and we need we need you to introduce yourself. Please do. Yeah, well I'm Andrea I don't actually know how to introduce myself anymore without like saying where I work I think need a different thing. Like I'm not just defined by the company. You are a university of michigan soccer player. Yeah. Go blue £65 ago. But yes. Um anyway, yeah. Yeah. Electric adviser...

...to this amazing company bite. I mean you could just say like, hey, I'm like the biggest fan of bite ever, which is my company shadow. Probably definitely the best CMO startup CMO in the tri state area. If not the U. S. Yeah, for sure. She's the dean of our CMO school. Yeah, I'm pumped for that by the way. We got some awesome awesome people to participate in that. I'm sure is their detention. I know you, I know you're immediately thinking about discipline for when people don't show up. Is their detention? Is there? Listen, I'm already like really nasty on slack about people not responding well as you should be because their pain and it's hurting cats getting these people to do things. Yeah, it really is actually. I wouldn't say I'm also in chief. That's a, you know, the group, you know, technically the tech startup that has like all the chiefs in new york females, that group is particularly difficult to get to do anything that's not like on the calendar, six months in advance. Crazy people are busy shout, shout to that. Well, Andrew. You were one of the first, I mean, you were one of the early, early members of the revenue collective, the O G S as we call it. I just kind of want to sit back and let you, you tell us about the early days and SAm and all the stories just go, first of all, I, I think SAm when you had first told me about it, I was thinking like cannot believe there isn't a thing for this, a good one, you know, because we used to talk about the challenges we had in our jobs, which for anybody like a revenue role, they suck. They're like the worst fucking jobs in the world because the bar is always too high. I always wanted to do more with less and you're like, you know, you're being to the ground every day. So just having a place where people could like talk to each other, give share practical knowledge about all those hardships was like really incredible. So the idea I think was really genius salmon as um I think Nicole, Nicole before me saying all those nice things, value, have to agree. Like the car just to stand it up and like get us all together. It was really incredible and like, yeah, I think it was, it was only it was very small group at first, but it's a testament to how awesome it is because it through word of mouth, right? I don't think you put any marketing dollars buying it for No, we didn't ever. I mean most of the time I was interacting with you because I was always trying to get you to be the CMO, whatever company I was at. That's like, do you want to, do you want to meet this idiot founder trench off to the meeting and come back and like, I don't know, I don't know. I don't know why you chose to work there sam but I'm not going to be working. I I'm like you're kind of like a jerk, like you don't want to work for that literally never did that to you man. So can you? I definitely tried to get SAm to come be my boss somewhere. That's okay. That was a good, that was a good gig. That was a good opportunity actually. I appreciated that. Look that was ceo of crazy. Did not Yeah, there was, but you know, whatever everything is, but we were at the offer stages at livestream then there then stuff happened and then I introduced you to Catherine at the muse and then you, we had a flirtation with Gherkin at behave box and I think it ended for the best for you. I think you landed at just the right place and you my friends. Right, Right. No, I I in my career I think the thing that I de prioritized until I got to 40 was like how important he was just like not going to work for jerks anymore and that's the bottom line. I don't think it's that difficult, but I don't think that there are many companies with good people like yourselves, you know? So when did you join the revenue collective? 2017. When did you start it? I know Michael, Michael manning manny. He was on earlier. Well, he says, he said he's the first paying I paid in other ways. I think my word of mouth with the first sweat equity and I think that's what I was trying to articulate. Like, first of all, just to be clear, Kyle Lacy was my referral. He absolutely was, He absolutely was the whole midwest. I don't know if we can do this, we'll have somebody try to map out the family tree, right? Because I think, I think Andrea what you're saying is your family trees bigger than everyone else's family tree in Pavilion. 100%. 1st of all, it's half new york and it's all the midwest. So I don't know, you tell me Andrew has been a...

...huge supporter. Andrew was also one of the leaders of, she was, I think the third leader of our third associate cohort before we opened it up. She's always been there. It was fun. Yeah. Tell me about the Dean, you're the Dean of the CMO school, which is launched. And tell me about that. You probably never thought you'd be a dean? No, I, but I'm very honored to have been the Dean. Yeah, we're putting together just like this awesome playbook for, well, it's more like a curriculum of just like, you know how to be a CMO And there were led by some people that like, I really admire, you know, like ryandunny G like that he was C. M. O. G. Two people are really good at building brand, but also like Toronto who just took off zero to like a billion dollar. I mean like, you know, just people like know their shit and Ryan Bonnici. Yeah. Nice dude. Yeah, good job. Like I mean it was more like a tell, I was like, hi you're slated for this course. He's like thank you. There's money by a little bit of money. It's not a ton of money but it's some money. Let's listen, it pays for, I don't know what does it pay for these days? Dinner maybe at dinner. Dinner. Yeah. Nice fancy dinner, pump it right back into economy. That's what we want. Especially at restaurants. Please do that. But no waiters, we only want kiosk ordering. You're going if you're going too fast food, we want that. We want waiters. No, we want, wait, let's get let's get the messaging down sam and you have to tell us something bad about sam. This is you know, you have to get 11 story where he doesn't look good so many. No, honestly, I think he touched on it a little because he said the companies he tried to recruit me at I think would have like, I don't know, give me more gray hair than I have now. So that's the only bad bad part. We wanted to work together so badly. I think we're willing to just like, I don't take awful opportunities. So for that, I'm thankful we did not get the opportunity to work together. But you're a wonderful person. Sam. You're wonderful Andrea out of all you've done. And I will continue to carry the RC torch for as long as I live. Well, I can't wait to see electrical public under your leadership. So. Yes. Oh my God. What is that? Thank you for stopping by. You are, you're number one in my book too. Thank you Brandon. And you mind. Hello? Hello. Hi. Butch. What's up much? Hi Sam. How are you? Thank you for allowing me to drink. We're so excited to have a week. Well, thank you on the week. The patios are finally open in Toronto. Thank God, jesus. Yeah, I have, I have an entire team up in Toronto and uh, we have been waiting for the day that they would reopen the city. What a disaster. It's been. My God. I'm so sorry to hear about that. But get out there and eat this weekend. I actually been buying anybody who wants to go out to you on my team. I'm buying them a bottle of wine to go sit out on the patio and just relax for just one day. So I totally get it. And when did you join the revenue collected? I'm sorry first. Let's have you introduce yourself to the audience. Okay. Which languages? So I'm the president? Well I guess I'm not the president event anymore. I'm now we just got acquired by lightspeed for 350 million us, which was awesome. Congratulations. Thank you. Thank you. And yeah, I, I joined, think Toronto was probably the 4th chapter. And I remember Sam reaching out to me, it was like late 2018 and talked about what he was doing and the history of all the companies he had worked for and all the experiences and talking about development and support. And then we talked a lot about protection for revenue leaders from over zealous ceos and Vcs quick to blame. And it was always, you know, big target on your back. This is the group of people in companies who have targets dates and not only that they reset every month. And I was sort of sitting there going, hey, I think I was one of those people in my three companies and I really feel pretty bad about that, but it did really resonate with me and I think that's, you know, that's what got me interested in doing it and it's become much more over the journey. But I remember at the time thinking, yeah, you know what revenue is everything and people need to be rewarded and paid for it. That's just, you know, hard stop. And I took that to heart and sort of lived it and in the vend, I'm this a secret, but I negotiated twice during my tenure invent and it turned out very,...

...very good. So well, you deserve it, my friend, thank you. Hey, we were uh, I met butch because there was a guy steven Delfina who used to be in new york and he moved to Toronto and he's a member. And I actually met up with Stephen in Singapore when we were both in Singapore at the same time. And I was pitching Stephen on being the Toronto chapter head, he said, I'm not the right person for it, but I know the right person, Let me introduce you and that person was the right person and that was bitch. Language, Stephen Delfina killing at a clerk. Oh, by the way, just oh, they're doing good situation already. He's crazy. Good. Uh yeah, I mean he's, he's anyway, Bush is an amazing person, stevens, amazing person. All of our members are amazing. Butch, tell us, tell us and the listeners a little bit about the Toronto are see chapter If you have any good stories around how it's helped people get jobs or network or grow. Obviously it helped you with a couple of those negotiations, but any other stories you have would be amazing. Yeah, I spend a ton of time with people on comp just because I'm really passionate about it and I want to make sure people, you know, get paid. I always think back and I remember, you know, it's like, oh, you know, I can do a happy hour, I can do a dinner every month. And it's actually, and I think one of the things that successful about the Toronto chapter is it's become way more important for me to keep this Canadian tech system going. It's all built on revenue. And if you've looked over the last 67 months, I think there's three unicorns in Canada, I mean, Lightspeed bought, which is a Canadian company out of Montreal, but then for $500 million, Canadian Shopify is there, it's all being driven by revenue. And there's a, this kinship I describe in the revenue collective where people are supporting each other and in Canada, it really works well and it's become important to me that people are supporting each other and rising them up to keep this tech boom going and we're really seeing it. There was an absence of revenue leaders, you know, in the 2000, 2000 and six sort of time frame in Canada who had scaled companies and now you have a bunch of them and we really lean on them in Toronto to help the other, you know, the new VPs of sales or new Cros to be successful and I think that's what really works about it. We had great dinners back then. Toronto is an amazing city for that. It's been a little bit quieter. But I love the feel of just the revenue collective, totally globally. But I find the Toronto groups a bit special just because, well we're Canadians, we're nice, but also we really bought into, we wanna, you know, we're going to build great companies, we can do it. Canadians are there are, they're a great, great group of people that's been my general experience. I'm not even saying that because Bush is on the line and they do build great companies. It's being it's being awesome. And I think the thing that when I think of this success, I always try to think of what makes the RC successful and the pressures that revenue leaders are under right in cos I'm going to tell you a funny story actually. But if there's a kinship amongst revenue leaders, we relate more with each other than we do with tech leaders, even the tech leaders in our company. So Kyle Norton was one of the 1st 20 people to join the Toronto chapter and at the time he was VP of Sales that league, which is a really successful company in Canada on the benefits side, about six months later, he becomes the VP point of sale for Shopify, which means we are now head to head competitors and we went to this first happy hour and we probably talked more than we should about how are companies were doing and what was being successful. And it was because it wasn't about him crushing me, me crushing him. It was, we can both support each other to do better. And I actually, that's where I really felt that I had more in common with him than I did in some of the people in my company who were in engineering and others and that's the kinship I think that really drives the community and I think Sam recognized that day one and I think, you know, a lot of that is just the sincerity, the, just how real it is and that it resonates with people and there's a kinship that's really strong and that's what really drives it. Hopefully that's a funny, it's a story. It's a great story and I hope tom and Brandon see because of what I was saying. Butch is that, uh, I'll repeat myself for the, probably the third time, but like for most tech companies, the software is there technology for us, the values are the technology and every single person that's come on the show today is saying the same thing, which is, hey, I figured out that like we can help each other, we can support each other. It's not a zero sum game. I can talk shop with Kyle Norton and Shopify...

...and vent can do well. And that's, that's fundamentally what I'm like, what we're trying to, that's the gospel. We're trying to spread. And it's, you know, beyond sales beyond marketing, it's just about, hey, there's another way to live your life in this world. It doesn't have to be cutthroat, You can still win. You're not sacrificing anything by being a good, compassionate person. That's still a path to success. Yeah. And Sam, you were real about that when I first met you and it's and you still are today and that's what dropping. I'll tell you one other, just funny story. I remember the first off site we had and SAm was changing the business model like every week there was something new and it was driving me crazy. You know, I was a venture capitalist at one time and it was just like dude like we need to you need to slow down and let things work a little bit and obviously he didn't listen to my advice which is good. I mean when you look at what's being developed over the last three years it would make any text startup Envious. I mean the programs that are coming out, the adjustments that are made, it's incredible and uh yeah at the time I thought we should really uh why don't we just master the dinners first before we go into all these other progress but you keep working with and it just keeps getting better and better and people love it. Oh that's good but incredible to have you on so much that that we can learn from you but I know your time is valuable, thank you so much for joining and such kind words last but not least, certainly not least if there was a godfather to the godfather, If there was, if there was um, you if Sam was still had amused, I think it would be fred maddock. He's certainly one of the early supporters. I can say that I have a funny story, but let's let fred introduced himself. I'm looking forward to hearing that story sounds well. Well, well here we are, my goodness. After all this. You know, I remember that the dinners and show you guys have talked about that. But the thing that sticks out for me, you know, is I remember we were in the behave box office. I think he was after that like first informal offside we have, which you were at Brandon, I think you should have late as usual. Um, and uh, and Richard come down from, from boston and we're coming down the escalators and he said hey listen fred I've got to tell you I'm I'm gonna leave behave box, I'm gonna do this full time. And I knew then that it was going to be something, you know it's always going to be. But you know it's just it was just a simple moment for me in terms of everything you were throwing that revenue collecting becoming like a full time gig. It was a great moment. What a right man. What a freaking ride. It's been amazing fred introduce yourself for the listeners. We're going to promote the show. So yeah so fred Mother cereal sales leader early early involved in the revenue Collective and from overseas from the U. K. Here in the US now doing consulting very much attached to all the original founders and a lot of other people and spend a lot of time helping members with the executive coaching on career and comp. And also spend a lot of time with those out of work in the OTB channel. So that's been a real reward for me personally, frankly to give back in that way to perhaps the part of the membership that's most in need. So that's that's super exciting what the O. T. O. T. V channel is. Just what that it's such a I think this is exactly what, as you said, one of the most important in need. Parts of of why you might be a part of Pavilion is because we have this community of people when you don't have a role and you need to find one. Tell us about that. Yeah, I mean, I think that the specific point about OTB is those that are actually out of work and it was SAm, I mean I sort of feel like I wish to come up myself, but he called me, you know, as Covid sort of came down March last year and said, hey fred, how do you feel about running the OTB group? And so that's really interesting and we didn't have much of a plan. I'd love that about SAm. He's like, listen, here's the idea, let's let's run with it and let the plan itself shape itself. And, you know, I've learned a huge amount. But yeah, we focus really critically on those that actually don't have a job of course, during Covid there was a massive excess of people from work. So we we had a lot to do and, you know, we just, we basically took the sort of career approach and broke it out in the way of a sort of sales pipeline, what you should do at the top of the funnel, when you're networking and all that type of stuff, get yourself ready, your profile, your resume, what have you, you know, what you then do through the middle the processes you're interviewing and what you're doing in the end when you're things like presenting and negotiating for comparable what have you. And we run a whole variety of sessions based on two weekly zoom sessions on on different...

...running topics relevant to the audience. And then we have a whole load of invited guests come to come in from, you know, the investment community, from recruiters from the coaching side of the world storytelling. I mean, you name it, we've put in front of them every single type of individual from whatever type of resource and you know, they're able to pick and choose where they want help, but you know, still built into that is what revenue collectors all about, which is the one on one help. So we have a model and a series of programs but still the self help and they held with the community is very much part of it too. And the really good thing about OTB is that it's not just the group that shows up for all the events, it's actually how they pick up between each other. You know, a lot of commonality cmos looking for job. How do they get together? Revenue leaders obviously the same. So the relationships that have been developing being wonderful. I mean I've got to know, I don't know 34 people probably this point and I'm uh well they've now got jobs, I'm online with them straight with with how they're getting on and how they're performing in those new roles. So yeah, it's been a it's been a really special thing Sam, what's your story you had in mind? Well a lot, I mean first just to say it fred, you've been such an incredible part of this growth, it's been so much fun and uh, so so inspiring and just a great partnership in my opinion, I hope, I think since you're on the show you probably feel somewhat similarly, but now it's, and I, so first of all, you know, a lot of what we did, you wanted to ask about the origin Brandon? One of the origins was probably in like 2013 or 2012 when I got introduced to a guy named Nick War Swick who worked with fred for a long time and there was a dinner of essentially intra links alumni, I forget what restaurant was somewhere in midtown and fred was part of it, I think when he worked at Undertone and that kind of like thought leadership dinner mastermind was, you know, part of the inspiration for the dinners that we ultimately did with revenue collected, I sort of talked away in my mind and then a couple years later later just you know, tried to do it similarly, but the one thing I always remember is that I left behave Vox and I was, No, I didn't like it was before behavior because it was, I was doing consulting in 2017 and I created this like diagnostic tool thing and I started pitching people and Fred and I have been talking and Fred came along to do some of these consulting projects and every time I would say something to Fred, he would be wildly enthusiastic and supportive and I was just so confused by his enthusiasm and he's like, yeah, that sounds good, I was like and we can, you know, we can run the workshops this way, He's like, absolutely love it, let's do it. So then I called him one day and I said fred, I love I love this enthusiasm, I just don't understand why you're so interested in working with me. And he said, well I actually believe in you, and I was just so you know, I wasn't used to uh I wasn't used to that at that time. And it was so, again, you know, we talk about like the value scaling it, like to have somebody believe in you that much. And to fred has been constantly supportive and constantly enthusiastic, and there has never been a day when he said, this is bullshit, and like, that teaches you that you can be that way to somebody else. And I guess the other thing I will say is I did exactly to the point, like I was on a run and I was thinking, oh, we don't have enough job sharing in the community to support all the people that are going to be able to work. So tv stands for on the bench. So I said, we should start a community focused on people that are out of work and fred should lead it. But that's all I said. And I called fred and said, hey, you want to do this thing. And he said sure would love to and the rest is fred. And so now, you know, there's so much that's come out of OTB again on the bench, it's like a core part of our value proposition. In fact, one of the things that came out of it was an entire division of revenue collective. Now Pavilion called Career Services, where we said, we actually we're going to intentionally staff this function and we're going to do it in such a way that like we like right now Caitlin who works with fred very closely sends out a talent partner update every week to all of the people that are sending us jobs were making dozens and dozens of connections. It's just um anyway, it's just one more story about how if you give some, you know, you give a great idea to somebody that can execute that idea and you just provide the right set of values which you already had in and then you can build something really inspirational. And then also, just by the way, fred does like, I don't know, 20 calls a week with different members, coaching them, changing their lives, helping them pick the right job, helping them extricate themselves from bad situations, helping them make sure that they get what they're worth. So anyway, thank you fred well, thanks SAm. And you know, I know we don't have a ton of time left here, but just to return the personal part of that when you and I got together and got to know each other really well, when you were thinking about leaving the work you're in, and I've just been let go from the last full time gig I had and uh you've...

...allowed an old guy like me to to have a future career. I mean, it's as simple as that and whether it be what I'm doing from the consulting standpoint to the point you made when you first got going early on, but also through our c I mean, I could have been doing something, sitting around, not really busy at all because of you and your contribution to me and how you've supported me. I've been able to have a second or third or fourth phase in my career that perhaps would have been either different or or less. So I'm hugely grateful to you, powerful and you've done for me super, super grateful virtual hug both of you. I mean I I have gotten, I have been the recipient of so much mentorship from the both of you that I, I should, I shouldn't even play my funny sounds for this. I feel like I've called fred on like a Wednesday at like two and said I need a drink at five with you. And he was there sitting at the bar waiting for me when when I showed up just to tell them about some issue or something that I was having and uh sam you know where you sit in my pantheon of amazing people. But it's not a surprise after talking with so many of the wonderful people today, especially the older crew, Meeting these amazing people talking to them and I hope you the audience hearing them is not surprised that this group to be where it is today, to grew to be 5000 members with each person still saying that there's value here and that there is amazing uplifting way to run your career, to run your life. Sam keeps saying here, this is actually just bringing the values out of the people who have them already, right? Like nobody's converting into being like this, we all are like this, we want to be like this, it's kind of other stuff that turns us into more vicious or whatever, but such a beautiful place of light, you know that you felt you've always done it, stand with a complete another belief in everybody in the community, and I know it's big now and you probably don't know as many as you would like to, but you've always always supported everybody who they are, how they are, where they come from, what their purpose is. You've just stood behind them and you've also done it with just a ridiculous amount of humility. You know, your your your willingness to what we'll see what happens, we'll give it a go, expect nothing. And if something great happens, then that's a wonderful outcome. I really give you credit. You've just you bought everybody into two to your, you know, your philosophy, your approach and the way to get this done. But you've done in a way that we've all felt like we should come along with you. It's been it's been absolutely one of you deserve all of this, my friend, thank you very much, wow. Well, I can't, I mean, I can't top that. That is the that's pretty much what, what's the charity right on top of the cake here? I mean, so just to review if anybody is still with us, if anybody is out there, this is now the Pavilion podcast. There's a new huge round of funding that SaM closed. There's tons more schools coming to teach and educate to acquisitions of two different communities and it's no longer just about revenue leaders, but about professionals across the entire landscape of businesses. And apparently SAm's a great guy. You nailed it. All right, Well, this has been amazing. Sam. Well, first friend, thank you for being here. You're really looking forward to the event at the end of the month. SaM that's going to be a wonderful thing. Is going to be awesome. Yeah, it's always a pleasure to have you. You and I share sharing the stage here. Revenue, Collective Pavilion podcast for life. Yeah, absolutely, pal. Thanks fred. I All right, well, let's end this thing up. You, Sam. You're the best. Goodbye. Goodbye. It's a climactic ending. Say something. Mhm.

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